GG versus HH Brakes and brakingperformance - Road Star Warrior Forum : Yamaha Star Warrior Forums

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Old 06-13-2012, 06:36 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default GG versus HH Brakes and brakingperformance

HH brake ratings provide 20% greater braking friction than GG rated brakes.

I believe the Yamaha replacement pads for the front brakes are GG versus HH for the recommended EBC replacement pads.

And the HH series has an integrated perforated back plate for reducing heat transer area on the pad by 50%.

Accordingly, conduction is directly proportional to surface area therefore by reducing the surface area in contact by half, you halve the heat transfer. This should really help ward off any fade issues driven by higher friction material.

Has anyone had HH brakes on the front for a couple of pad sets, and did they improve braking performance by your seat of the pants measures. Seems like this upgrade to HH is a no brainer if you ride aggressively or ride two up. Understanding that you will replace the front pads more often and you may experience more squeal, I can live with that.
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Old 06-13-2012, 07:09 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Wouldn't touch those hh pads with a ten foot pole. they're good when hot but cold and wet..forgetaboutit... and once they get hot they grab way too hard for slow riding you got to be pushing at all time for the hh. good for track day but not for casual riding. tried it a couple years ago removed them after about 200 mi.almost died in the rain one time because they would not whoa me up.
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Old 06-13-2012, 07:12 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Wouldn't touch those hh pads with a ten foot pole. their good when hot but cold and wet..forgetaboutit... and once they get hot they grab way too hard for slow riding you got to be pushing at all time for the hh. good for track day but not for casual riding. tried it a couple years ago removed them after about 200 mi alm

OK, but the HH rating means that they have the same coefficient of friction in hot and cold operatng environments. Has something changed perhaps ? This pad came out in 2004.
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Old 06-13-2012, 07:20 PM   #4 (permalink)
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OK, but the HH rating means that they have the same coefficient of friction in hot and cold operatng environments. Has something changed perhaps ? This pad came out in 2004.
yes cold is not so bad but you can tell when they heat up they get real grabby which ain't so bad when your haulin' asss but when you slow down they almost lock up .and hot or cold in the rain they are scary. try em' if you want but i say save your money unless your going to the track
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Old 06-13-2012, 07:34 PM   #5 (permalink)
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I had EBC HH on my previous (sports) bike and loved them. And I plan to go to them on my Warrior when I next need pads.

The HH never were underpowered, even in snow.. Though most of my riding in AZ is in the heat (preheated ftw)

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Old 06-13-2012, 10:42 PM   #6 (permalink)
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I've run HH pads on various bikes for years and feel they are good all around pads. I do echo 60ftgap's thoughts on wet use though. I have never experienced great braking with them in the wet. I'd recommend them with good lines and high temperature brake fluid. Maybe not so much as an OEM replacement though.
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Old 06-14-2012, 03:58 AM   #7 (permalink)
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I ALWAYS run HH pads on all my bikes (front and rear) and have done for years.
I don't honestly recall having experienced any squeal problems.
The wear rate is good and braking power is improved.
Plus - the added bonus of no brake dust residue on wheels, rotors etc.

They allegedly wear the rotors quicker than the stock pads - but I can't say I've noticed!



I won't use any other pads - highly recommended!
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Old 06-14-2012, 05:09 AM   #8 (permalink)
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I'm still not positive but I was told the GG pads are standard fiber and the HH pads are sintered pads, is that right?

I installed the Yamaha sintered pads a couple years ago because of the fade experienced on mountain roads. Solved it. There's no venting holes on the pad's steel plate, but there is a segmented vent line down the mid-pad.

I don't really know enough about this so figured I'd ask.

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Old 06-14-2012, 05:24 AM   #9 (permalink)
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This is the 2008 article explaining it in a way I understood it back then, so I kept it.
Turns out its still out there on the web. BTW the Break-In (rebedding) is real important.

------------------------------

Ref: Yamaha YZF R1 Sportbike blog: Which brake pads to choose for your sportbike?

Sunday, 28 December 2008

Which brake pads to choose for your sportbike?

Choosing the right brakepads for your sportbike
When I am looking in my owner's manual they do not mention anything about which brake pad to choose (off course, they want you to go to the dealership and have them changed with oem brake pads). Is that really the best way? What about all these different brake pads manufacturers all claiming to be the best? Have you ever experienced after changing brakepads that they were not at all what you expected out of them? Here is some insight on choosing brake pads for your application:

Let's look at how a brakepad is made.

Resins are used to hold the brake pad materials together such as the friction materials being fibreglass, kevlar or arimid. Steel and aluminum maintain the heat stability. There is also filler material such as saw dust. Sometime graphite is added to adjust friction level depending on temperature range of use.

Molding process
Are the pads pressed in a mold one by one or mass pressed? High performance brake pads are pressed one at a time. This would be more durable as the full pressure was applied. Are the brake pads slow cured or rapid cured? Usually after pressing the materials in the mold the brake pads go in an oven to remove moisture that is present in the friction mixture. Needless to say, slow curing is always better. rapid curing of the pads can put stress on the friction material by the moisture escaping too fast creating small cracking.

The codes on Brake Pads steel backing plate
The codes refer to the friction formulation and show the consumer its ranking in the chase test.

What is the 'chase test'?
This is where those two letter designation come. The chase test is assigned to add a two letter code that we often see on brake pads. EE, FF, GG, HH. Those letters specify the coefficient of friction when a 1" square piece of friction material is subjected to varying conditions of load, temperature, pressure and rubbing speeds on a chase machine.

The first letter refers to the normal friction coefficient. The second letter refers to the hot friction coefficient based on the fade and recovery test. Brake fade is when you notice brake power is less efficient. Recovery is where your pads are cooling down again. H has the highest coefficient of friction. (superior braking power)
The friction coefficient codes are as follows:
C = < d =" 0.15" e =" 0.25" f =" 0.35" g =" 0.45" h =" "> 0.55

Now you would think that HH is all you need. Wrong. H might be braking to much if you're only commuting. Racing pads might never reach to the right working temperature... It's pretty much up to you which brake pad is best for you.

I am happy with EBC Sintered Double-H pads. Great pads, if you follow the break in guidelines you will stop a lot sooner and safer. Combine this with stainless steel brake lines and braking will be excellent. Break in: 10 stops from 80 to 40mph. Use some 220 sandpaper on the rotors to remove old pad residue.

Last edited by arizonawarrior; 06-14-2012 at 05:28 AM.
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Old 06-14-2012, 11:06 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arizonawarrior View Post
I'm still not positive but I was told the GG pads are standard fiber and the HH pads are sintered pads, is that right?

I installed the Yamaha sintered pads a couple years ago because of the fade experienced on mountain roads. Solved it. There's no venting holes on the pad's steel plate, but there is a segmented vent line down the mid-pad.

I don't really know enough about this so figured I'd ask.
Sintering is a manufacturing process. Sintered Brakes have become a standard on 99% of Motorcycles and ATVs from the OE Builders.

Sintering is a method used to create objects from powders. It is based on atomic diffusion. Diffusion occurs in any material above absolute zero, but it occurs much faster at higher temperatures. In most sintering processes, the powdered material is held in a mold and then heated to a temperature below the melting point. The atoms in the powder particles diffuse across the boundaries of the particles, fusing the particles together and creating one solid piece.
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