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Old 04-09-2016, 11:10 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Turbo Warrior Build

The following is a list topics and threads that contain information about doing a DIY turbo project with the Warrior. Not everyone will choose to do everything I did. Some will do more and some will do less. For example, you don’t have to replace your injectors with higher flowing ones, I did. You don’t have to replace your stock fuel pump with a higher capacity pump, I didn’t, others have. It all depends one what your goals are and what all you want to do. There are several pages of threads available. I used the search terms “turbo” and ”boost”. I tried to only include threads that actually discussed the technical aspects of fabricating your own setup. There are several threads that talk little about the DIY aspect of turbocharging that were excluded. I included some discussions that were relevant even though they were referring to a production turbo kit. After the fabrication part is complete there were some commonalities related to getting the whole system tuned and running correctly. That being said I didn’t go into detail about the other mods related to doing your own turbo like the Barnett SR-2 conversion, putting in larger injectors, rising rate FPR, etc. Not everybody will do all of those, but there is plenty of information of the site related to the various topics for those who choose to do them. Possibly in the future those will be included as this thread expands. There were several threads not included because it was not relevant from a DIY or kit perspective, just generalized talk about Patrick Racing, Orient Express or whatever. Lots of broken links on some of the older threads. If the conversation was relevant it was included regardless. Frankenstein's blog has been down for some time now so there are no links to that included. There are several pictures on his profile page but he hasn’t logged on since 2011. Maybe someone can contact him and have him post to this even though he’s not active on here anymore. Please realize while reading this that I am by no means a forced induction expert. Actually, I learned everything from this forum and its members, the two books I read, and internet searches. I am starting this thread to hopefully help someone in the future who would like to tackle something like this for themselves. If you decide to post to this discussion, please stay on topic and realize that there are multiple ways to accomplish the same thing often times. I spent a lot of hours looking through threads and gathering information before I turned my first wrench. I would highly recommend anyone looking to do this to first do your homework and know exactly what you’re getting into. It will save you a lot of heartache down the road. For all those who dare to go down this road, good luck and enjoy the process. It can be very frustrating at times but the end result is well worth it. Safe riding.
M

My entire build thread is located on my blog. www.TurboWarrior.WordPress.com
As this thread develops I’ll try to migrate the different posts to this thread.
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Old 04-09-2016, 11:13 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Default Project Preparations

Before taking on a project like this you will want to do your homework and know what you're getting into. If you have experience with forced induction then you are off to a good start. If you're like me and didn't know a whole lot about turbocharging then I recommend two books: Corky Bell's “Maximum Boost” and Joe Hailey's “Motorcycle Turbocharging, Supercharging and Nitrous Oxide”. Below are a few graphs from Joe Hailes book. They give you an idea of where you'll be HP wise given a certain amount of boost. They're pretty darn accurate. Even if you are familiar with forced induction they would be an excellent review before starting your Turbo Warrior project. Definitely don't want to grenade your motor. That being said the first thing you'll need is a turbo.

https://turbowarrior.wordpress.com/2...-a-slow-start/
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Last edited by MMFB; 04-09-2016 at 11:18 AM. Reason: heading
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Old 04-09-2016, 11:14 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Default Turbo Selection

In deciding on a turbo for the Warrior you will have to where you are going to place it, how will it be mounted, etc. If you can afford an oil less turbo then you won't have to worry about an oil supply and drain. It is a good idea to have a target or goal in mind for the eventual horsepower that you would like to have. I had no idea about this one, I just wanted more. At this point I was sorta shooting in the dark. I didn't want to spend all my time with this project and not be happy with the eventual HP gains but I didn't want to ruin my engine or have an unmanageable amount of new found power on two wheels. So, I designed it to go up to 14psi but initially only planned on 5-7psi of boost. At 14 psi boost you are at the threshold of where you need to start in cooperating an intercooler to reduce the the risk of detonation. So would argue you need to do it before 14psi, more like 12psi. Regardless, the Warrior motor makes about 150 cfm at redline. So double that, 300 cfm and you're at 14 psi, double the stock output. I labored hard over different compressor maps until I finally decided to go with a Mitsubishi TD04HL-13T turbo. It's maximum output is about 400 cfm. Looking back maybe I would have gone with a 13G if I had to do it over. Its maximum cfm is 360. But, on the flip side the 13T has a great power curve for the warrior. According to the compressor map 14.7psi right in the sweet spot of the power curve. Not only that but based on this map I could go up about 22 psi before it starts dropping off the power curve. More than adequate for my needs. After I decided on the turbo I decided I wanted to port and polish the intake for maximum airflow. I had to rebuild the turbo anyway, so I might as well port and polish while I'm at it, right?

Here's a good read on turbo compressor maps and some general good info on turbo charging. It has lots of information of multiple brands of turbos and superchargers.

https://www.rbracing-rsr.com/turbotech.html

Some basic conversions:
Convert CFM to lb/min: Mass Flow(lb/min) = 0.0756 x Volume Flow(cfm)
.18bm3/sec = 381 cfm
.17 m3/sec = 360 cfm
.16 m3/m3/sec = 339 cfm
.15 m3/sec = 318 cfm
.14 m3/sec = 296 cfm
.13 m3/sec = 275 cfm
.12 m3/sec = 254 cfm
.11 m3/sec = 230 cfm
.10 m3/sec = 211 cfm
.09 m3/sec= 191 cfm
.08m3/sec = 170 cfm
.07m3/sec = 148 cfm
.06m3/sec = 127 cfm
.05 m3/sec = 106 cfm


6 cm2 = 0.41 A/R
7 cm2 = 0.49 A/R
8 cm2 = 0.57 A/R
9 cm2 = 0.65 A/R
10 cm2 = 0.73 A/R
11 cm2 = 0.81 A/R
12 cm2 = 0.89 A/R


https://turbowarrior.wordpress.com/2...rbo-selection/
https://turbowarrior.wordpress.com/2...and-polishing/
https://turbowarrior.wordpress.com/2...d-polishing-2/
https://wordpress.com/post/turbowarr...dpress.com/212
https://turbowarrior.wordpress.com/2...essor-housing/
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Old 04-09-2016, 11:16 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Default Rebuilding

If you decide to buy a used turbo unless your are 100% sure it doesn't need to be rebuilt, I would rebuild it to make sure that it is 100% before you install everything. Iím a big fan of taking care of potential problems before they occur and a leaking turbo spewing oil is not what I wanted. Just my advice. Here's the guy I purchased my rebuild kit from.
Turbo Lab of America
He's got all sorts of videos about different turbos, rebuilds and the like. There are others this is just the one I used.
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Old 04-09-2016, 11:19 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Default Header Fabrication

Once you decide on your turbo and where and how you're going to hang it (forward facing or rearward facing, etc.), you will need to make the headers. If all goes right the turbo will be hanging where you want it. I would recommend going with a smaller diameter tubing as opposed to a larger diameter. This is because the smaller tubing can have a tighter curves/bends. It may not sound like much but having the turbo sit just one inch closer to the motor can make a huge difference in comfort when you go to ride her.
I also had my headers ceramic coated both inside and out. I did everything I could to help reduce radiant heat. It also is supposed to help with air flow. Additionally, the pipes should last longer being ceramic coated since I have them wrapped as well. There are plenty of discussions on the internet about how pipes can get prematurely degraded due to being wrapped. I also went with mild steel for all my piping. I decided to install a pyrometer at the base of the turbo where the header pipes meet at the turbo flange. This was because I had to decide on an EGT gauge or an AFR gauge at the time. Funds were a little tight so I went with the EGT gauge. Sorta glad I did because I can monitor my exhaust gas temp and therefore my engine temperatures. If I had to choose between an AFR and an EGT, Iíd choose an AFR. But, that would require two O2 sensors, one for the gauge and one for the fuel management system. Iím sure there is a way to use one for both but I didnít want to get into that at the time. I use a POD300 to monitor the AFR and a whole host of other things. I highly recommend it for those who like to monitor everything.

https://turbowarrior.wordpress.com/2...eader-fabbing/
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Old 04-09-2016, 11:20 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Default Intake Piping

The intake piping and the header fabrication were by far the most challenging aspects of the project. I cannot stress enough the importance of having the proper tools for the job. Being able to weld good or having a friend who can weld good are priceless. Since you're limited on space under the tank a smaller diameter tubing is better here as well. I would recommend the same size as the throttle body intake, or even slightly smaller and use a silicone coupler to step up in size to fit over the throttle bodies. This will allow you to make tight curves. I used 2Ē pipes, the same as I did for the headers, and even though I got it to work it would have been easier with smaller diameter tubing. Others have used all silicone tubing with good success as well. I liked using the mild steel tubing as it allows me to tap into it for another boost source. This particular one powers my boost gauge and my 2 bar MAP sensor. I had to drill and tap my Turbo compressor housing for a boost source for the wastegate.

https://turbowarrior.wordpress.com/2...intake-piping/
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Old 04-09-2016, 11:20 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Default High Flow Injectors

Not everyone will want to or have to replace their stock injectors. I chose to because as long as I had the bike torn down I figured I might as well do it now instead of wishing I had done it later. The turbo kit produced by PR and OE didn't require you to change out your injectors. But from what I had read I would reach the limitations of the stock injectors or put them under a lot of stress and risk locking them up if I didn't. From my understanding this would only happen if I started going over 12-14 psi. Just a ballpark here. But regardless I did want to tap out the duty cycle and have a catastrophic failure at high speeds. One of the benefits of having high flow injectors was that I didn't require a RR FPR to keep up with the demands of the turbo. According to my research on the forum the stock fuel pump would keep up for some time as well. Others have replaced their fuel pump as well. For higher boost or racing applications this might be necessary. But for less than 20 psi boost the stock pump will work. I used Five O for my injectors. Five O
The picture of the blue line is to let you know that they come marked from the factory like that. Make sure when you replace your injectors that you torque them to spec and the blue lines line back up when you're done. There is a step by step guide to doing this in the service manual.

https://turbowarrior.wordpress.com/2...low-injectors/
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Old 04-09-2016, 11:21 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Default Exhaust Fabrication

The exhaust fabrication was definitely a lot easier than the header or intake fabrication. This is where you want a bigger pipe to reduce pressure. Does it have to be 3Ē, in my humble opinion, no. The turbo will push the air regardless. Iím sure there are people who will swear up and down that you need to have the largest pipe on there as you can. Here again a smaller diameter pipe will allow you to bend and design a system with smaller turns and be more comfortable to ride, ie less chance of burning your leg.

https://turbowarrior.wordpress.com/2...7/exhaust-fab/
https://turbowarrior.wordpress.com/2...st-fab-part-2/
https://turbowarrior.wordpress.com/2...st-fab-part-3/
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Old 04-09-2016, 11:21 AM   #9 (permalink)
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Default External Dyna coil relocation

I suppose you donít have to hang your dyna coils on the outside of your bike. But, since I had already upgraded mine, moved them under the tank, the next step was to externally mount them. I had to make a bracket to hold my dyna coil motor mount. The dyna coil holders are easy to find, just do an internet search for them. Space was at a premium under the tank so this was the best thing to do for me. Plus, I love the look. I originally had them relocated with an Akitadog relocation plate. I kept this and reused it for this project.

https://turbowarrior.wordpress.com/2...he-dyna-coils/
https://turbowarrior.wordpress.com/2...ring-clean-up/
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Old 04-09-2016, 11:22 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Default SR-2 Clutch Conversion

I would highly recommend doing the Barnett SR-2 clutch conversion while you’re doing your turbo project. I would also recommend the red springs. You might be able to get away with the green springs but you take the risk of having your clutch slip while under boost. The red springs are not that bad. If you’re in stop and go traffic and you have to continually pull on the clutch then yes, you’re are will get tired. Otherwise they aren't bad at all so don’t be afraid of them. I would also recommend upgrading your cables to Barnett cables or a similar brand while you’re at it. Reason being that the stock cables have been known to break after a while. Another failure I wanted to prevent. Does it mean that the Barnett cables will never break? No, but why not lessen the odds. There is tons of information on the forum on how to do the SR-2 conversion. I would recommend putting a towel or blanket under the cover and supporting it if you don't fully remove it during the modification. If you don't the cover will get a scratched up. All I can say about this mod is take your time and don’t force anything. I broke the cable and part of the clutch post because like a bone head I forced it. Lesson learned. Also, get a new gasket before you start. Not everyone will say that you need one but here again I would rather have it and not need it. I also would use black oil resistant gasket sealant. That and a new gasket will keep you from having it leak oil after you're done.
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