RS Warrior Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

Registered
Joined
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So with nothing else to do, I figure I'll hop on the bike with a friend, and hit the road. We laid out a very basic roadmap to start estimating times, distances, and landmarks.

Curious if any of you have done trips like this before, have suggestions, or any input on places to see or what to do to prepare.

The idea is to do an iron butt the first day (1,000 miles in less than 24hrs), and then continue at an estimated 400 miles per day afterward. Guessing we'll do about 100 miles, then stop for gas, stretch etc, then continue on. Factoring 60mph and 20min breaks each stop, that puts us at 2hrs per every 100 miles, or 8 hours of riding per day to cover 400 miles. That 60mph might be conservative, but with no windscreens currently, not sure if we'll be wanting to bomb the highways for this long (If you have one, please see my WTB post in the other section of the forums for the gear I'm looking to acquire before the trip).

Planning on camping out for most places, and packing food with maybe a grocery store visit every week or so. I'm expecting a lot of places that might still be closed during this, so I won't plan on stopping at famous restaurants or attractions like I normally would. We will probably focus on nice twisty/scenic roads, as well as national parks to visit.

248434
 

Registered
Joined
314 Posts
Sounds like a tough plan. Pretty straight planned, hope you have fun 馃
Ride safe and let's participate. Send a picture from time to time.
I would love to follow your road trip.

Ride safe guys 馃檹馃憤
 

Registered
Joined
966 Posts
Good luck and enjoy. I've done a few longer trips on the bike. I've done up to 600 miles in a day. Cruising at 70 I would get about 120miles before the light came on, then stop for gas. 20 minutes is about the quickest you can make a stop for gas, bathroom, snack and stretch.
I think your biggest challenge will be finding places to stay. In the Northeast alot of hotels and campgrounds are closed.
I highly recommend a full face helmet for long trips. Also an intercom system with your riding buddy. I have a sena 10s and love it for music, phone and intercom.
Good luck and send pictures.
I give you some gear options on your WTB post.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
 

Administrator
Joined
28,404 Posts
If you have done 1000/24 before then you know what you are looking at. If you have never before done 1000 miles in 24 hours, then imo this is a terrible way to start for a journey like this. It leads to early fatigue. Your planned route is full of traffic centers its not all open road. Plus semitruck traffic is rapidly returning.

I like doing massive miles first day, just to get gone. Then I like to hang out in a spot with food and drink so I can relax and rest. After that I like ~250 mile riding days starting in the dark so I can have some fun and go see things and be checked-in before dark.

You cannot carry a week's food drink etc. Plus you need two complete sets of clothes and spare socks, plus kit.

If you use synthetic motor oil you can probably make the loop without stopping for oil changes. Watch the wear pattern on the rear tire. A couple times I ordered a spare tire delivered to a bike shop along my route. It was in rough shape by the time I got there. Modern dual compound tires like Avon Storm 3D XM can probably make the loop. You should get twice the miles on your front tire versus the rear. Usually.

You will need light rain gear, full-face, dry boots, do-rag, sun protection, good pants and coat. Get summer gloves with wrists.

Lube all cable ball-ends with shot of WD40. Get a spare headlight bulb if its been installed for years. Pack the factory tool kit at minimum. Re-visit the Yamaha video for the correct way to check warm motor oil level.

Map out gas stations. In remote areas I sometimes call and ask the gas station what hours they are open. This saved my bacon once.

Pack a couple bottles of water every day. Shine-up your Gremlin bell too.
 

Premium Member
Joined
3,381 Posts
All pretty good advice and I concur the Warrior and 1000 miles in 24 hours is an iron butt endeavour. I did 600 in a day and I was kinda tuckered out by the end but that was as goi 70 to 75 gas, bathroom and go. Take a spare clutch cable as well if you ain't sure how old it is.
 

Registered
Joined
374 Posts
Did the IB on Warrior on russian "roads"))) Complited a 7000miles trip at 2 weeks. With no any problems. By I was equiped almoust to anything.

For this kind of trip I have in my backpack a clutch cable and a v-belt. It is my minimum.
 

Registered
Joined
37 Posts
I鈥檓 here in CO and was planning a trailer to LA and ride Route 66 back with the in-laws from Germany this week. That obviously fell through. My ride is all set with the basics for the trip: windshield- amazing to relax behind, new grips with a throttle paddle helps with fatigue, dual touring riding seat with back rest for two, highway bars for safety, saddlebags, sissybar bag, floorboards, and 33T pulley. Totally changed the look of the beast, but the heart is still there. I used to think I wanted to a break after an hour riding, but now could easily run the tank dry. Happy to give you rides worth doing here in the state, and I鈥檓 still putting the details into the packing and hoping myself to pickup some more tips.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Registered
Joined
570 Posts
I rode cross-country 4000 miles over the 2013 summer. I packed way too much but I thought I'd be heading to Mexico for the 2nd half. I bought a year-pass ($80) for the National Parks - best purchase I made. I'm not sure they are open during the epidemic. Hitting the National Parks was great; gave me a destination every day.

National Forests/Campgrounds
Don't know how much $$$ you're planning on spending but you can save loads if you bring a tent and sleep in National Forests. Once to twice a week, I would find a campground to shower. Campgrounds and motels are just about the same price per night (I can't believe it either. Campgrounds are about $15-$25 depending on if you want a power outlet and wifi. Motels start at $25 and you have a room and TV. There is an app that will give you location and prices for campgrounds.

Tank bag for electronics
I had a tank bag that held all my electronics, cords and cables - phone, phone charger, cigarette lighter port so I could charge multiple USBs at once. I also brought a power inverter to plug regular things like a laptop, or portable blender for protein shakes and smoothies. I also brought a 100-ft battery tender extension to charge the bike when I was at a motel/campground

Power Inverter

Fuel Bottle
I bought a 1.5 Liter fuel bottle. It saved me twice in Arizona.

Itinerary/Route
I would skip Arizona, unless that's your way to the Grand Canyon, but go towards Las Vegas, and hit up Bryce and Zion in Utah. A little bit more north is Canyonland and that is a dream for motorcycle riders. Just amazing. Then you could go down to Grand Canyon, hit up the Navajo Reservation and make your way to 4 corners, from there you have CO or NM. I wouldn't go through Kansas - there is absolutely nothing to see (sorry, Kansas people). Arkansas has hot springs and riding the Appalachian back north would be a great finish

Those are my suggestions.

First, spend your money on the intercom system. but like everyone else said: rain gear, SOCKS (buy them on the road at Walmart/Target), sunscreen, boots, a small tool kit, etc

Good Luck and please check in once in a while. A few forum members might let you crash at their place. Well, with this COVID thing, maybe not, LOL!!!
 

Registered
Joined
11 Posts
If you have done 1000/24 before then you know what you are looking at. If you have never before done 1000 miles in 24 hours, then imo this is a terrible way to start for a journey like this. It leads to early fatigue. Your planned route is full of traffic centers its not all open road. Plus semitruck traffic is rapidly returning.

I like doing massive miles first day, just to get gone. Then I like to hang out in a spot with food and drink so I can relax and rest. After that I like ~250 mile riding days starting in the dark so I can have some fun and go see things and be checked-in before dark.

You cannot carry a week's food drink etc. Plus you need two complete sets of clothes and spare socks, plus kit.

If you use synthetic motor oil you can probably make the loop without stopping for oil changes. Watch the wear pattern on the rear tire. A couple times I ordered a spare tire delivered to a bike shop along my route. It was in rough shape by the time I got there. Modern dual compound tires like Avon Storm 3D XM can probably make the loop. You should get twice the miles on your front tire versus the rear. Usually.

You will need light rain gear, full-face, dry boots, do-rag, sun protection, good pants and coat. Get summer gloves with wrists.

Lube all cable ball-ends with shot of WD40. Get a spare headlight bulb if its been installed for years. Pack the factory tool kit at minimum. Re-visit the Yamaha video for the correct way to check warm motor oil level.

Map out gas stations. In remote areas I sometimes call and ask the gas station what hours they are open. This saved my bacon once.

Pack a couple bottles of water every day. Shine-up your Gremlin bell too.
Great advice. I just got back we'd Wednesday morning from a run from CT to SC, then down to Florida.
I'd check weather every day with accuweather app. Rain pants and frogg tog jacket good idea. I left in 45 degree weather and came back in about the same. I suggest will socks they are the best even if wet.
I have a small Mohawk windsheild that really helped deflect some wind from my chest at 70 to 85 mph, **** cops are all over and they hide well. So it was hard to run and faster. The warrior saddle is surprisingly comfortable, but it would have been nice to have a hyway bar with pegs to stretch out on.
 

Registered
Joined
966 Posts
Maybe something is different about my pegs, but I am able to straighten my legs and turn my toes outward and rest the baxk of my foot on the pegs and ride like that for hours.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
 

Registered
Joined
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Man thanks for all the a awesome responses guys. I didn鈥檛 get any emails and thought this thread was dead until I checked it today.

Sounds like I have some shopping and planning to do. Need some rain gear, saddle bags (plus I think I鈥檒l need mounts for saddle bags? Found some Nelson Riggs), sissy bar so I can throw a backpack on it, power inverter (thanks for the tip on that, completely overlooked it), a throttle heel pad for wrist fatigue or maybe a cruise control device, and maybe a windscreen (any advice on other brands or generic screens that fit our bikes?)

Also good idea on keeping a spare gas bottle, belt, and clutch cable in the bag. Headlight is new so I鈥檒l probably be good, but I like the idea of leaving while it鈥檚 still dark out to really enjoy the open road and avoid traffic/heat.

For those who have done the IB before, think it鈥檚 better to do at the beginning or end? Figured this would be best to knock out early, and I know I can stay somewhere in CO if needed the day after to recoup.

Given everything even with the reopenings, I think the plan is camping in national parks and avoiding most restaurants and hotels. So good suggestions on the park pass, I always forget you have to pay for most national parks. The route still needs some adjustments, but thank you for all the good stops! Hopefully ironing out a more solid map in the next few days.

Question about riding pants. My buddy has a nice pair of armored pants, as well as some Tobacco jeans that are lined for abrasion. Opinions on if these are a worthwhile investment for a trip like this? Otherwise I鈥檒l be in regular leather boots, jeans, and my armored leather jacket with a pair of AS gauntlets I have.

Thanks again for all the feedback on this!
 

Registered
Joined
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Wear the most comfortable and most protective clothing and gear you can afford. You are worth it.
Got a pair of UglyBros Motorpool-K pants. They're pricey but I put on my buddies and man are they comfortable, especially for just walking around national parks after riding. They're actually a little softer than my jeans, and with all the protection with kevlar and removable pads, it was hard to say no. You pushed me to it Arizona, so I blame you for the credit card bill that's about to ensue from this trip lol
 

Registered
Joined
11 Posts
Man thanks for all the a awesome responses guys. I didn鈥檛 get any emails and thought this thread was dead until I checked it today.

Sounds like I have some shopping and planning to do. Need some rain gear, saddle bags (plus I think I鈥檒l need mounts for saddle bags? Found some Nelson Riggs), sissy bar so I can throw a backpack on it, power inverter (thanks for the tip on that, completely overlooked it), a throttle heel pad for wrist fatigue or maybe a cruise control device, and maybe a windscreen (any advice on other brands or generic screens that fit our bikes?)

Also good idea on keeping a spare gas bottle, belt, and clutch cable in the bag. Headlight is new so I鈥檒l probably be good, but I like the idea of leaving while it鈥檚 still dark out to really enjoy the open road and avoid traffic/heat.

For those who have done the IB before, think it鈥檚 better to do at the beginning or end? Figured this would be best to knock out early, and I know I can stay somewhere in CO if needed the day after to recoup.

Given everything even with the reopenings, I think the plan is camping in national parks and avoiding most restaurants and hotels. So good suggestions on the park pass, I always forget you have to pay for most national parks. The route still needs some adjustments, but thank you for all the good stops! Hopefully ironing out a more solid map in the next few days.

Question about riding pants. My buddy has a nice pair of armored pants, as well as some Tobacco jeans that are lined for abrasion. Opinions on if these are a worthwhile investment for a trip like this? Otherwise I鈥檒l be in regular leather boots, jeans, and my armored leather jacket with a pair of AS gauntlets I have.

Thanks again for all the feedback on this!
I bought street and steel jeans from cycle gear. They are comfortable for me
 

Registered
Joined
14 Posts
I have done long distances on road trips (700 miles). I highly suggest riding as much as you can leading up to the trip to get you in 'shape' for the long ride. There are muscles that you don't use much that you will on a bike. When I use to commute everyday on my bike, long trips were easy. Once I worked from home, even a 250 mile day wasn't as easy. Also consider chopping it up a bit. Instead of doing one long day, spread it out over days. Do 500 mile days instead of 400 mile days. Both are long, but enjoyable if the scenery is nice.

A small windscreen will help, particularly at interstate speeds over a long period of time. Even a fly screen will make the difference. But play with them first, you don't want the windscreen to cause helmet to be in turbulent air. While it may not be a big deal for an hours ride, at the end of a 8 to 10 hour riding day, it adds up. A big windscreen would be better.

Definitely wear ear plugs as the road noise will wear on you. This will help you ride longer. I wear ear plugs all the time and it helps hear my helmet speakers at higher speeds over no ear plugs. Plus I protect my hearing (my wife already says I'm deaf). And get an intercom and play music, it always makes my rides more enjoyable.

Hydrate when you are on the road. I put a water bladder in my tank bag and take sips as I ride. The wind will dry you are when you get to the Southwest. Then get a drink when you stop for gas.

Get a small tool kit with wire & duct tape for on the road repairs. Consider a cheap tire puncture kit, you know if you get one you won't get a flat.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top