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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
The Burrito map is known to run better on many Warriors. Go ahead now and ride the bike as you normally would. There is no further benefit in trying to make it not pop. Your riding style is not the problem. The bike likes rpm.

Ride it to see how it does. If low rpm is noisy then test this. In 1500 rpm line make the 19's into 17. Make the 20 an 18. Make the 18 a 16. See if this smooths the acceleration arc and reduces pop. If it does, then play with mild smoothing. The idea is that, when accelerating normally, you don't want to induce erratic fueling simply because you are slightly progressively twisting the throttle open. It can force the motor to seek and surge. So test to smooth it for times when you need to ride in some posted speed zone and cannot just accelerate through that set of fields. Keep in mind that the hard-coded fuel map in the ECU is not what most would expect it to look like. Some detuning is coded-in. However, even so, the stock throttle control on a stock setup is nicely mannered. Smooth. So it's fine to smooth an aftermarket map but the fact is there will be field anomalies because of gearing and power band.

There is an introductory help file in Documentation (Fuel Managers, Post #2) that gets into how to start thinking in multiple directions. Its titled About Power Commander Map Values. It helps tweak your brain to envision what is happening when you ride at (for example) a fixed rpm versus accelerate thru that rpm or decelerate back thru that rpm. It highlights that the map fields are applied when accelerating thru the conditions and when decelerating through the conditions.

It's a weird way to think. But to the extent it can be seen in your minds eye while you are riding normally, it helps you notice points in the map by guessing its throttle position and rpm and if it happens when accelerating or decelerating. Then you can look at the map file and effectively test small incremental tweaks in rpm changes both at fixed throttle and during increasing/decreasing throttle. Then some of the weird map values cause less worry. Others might jump up and beg for testing. RPM learning curve lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
Isn't it fun how a thread about bump hardware morphs into a bigger conversation about maps and the choices we make about fuel management on this big cube beast.
 

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I was just thinking that and how I should probably spin this off into a separate thread specifically about my bike's fuel management challenges and just come back to this thread once I wire in my bump switch. I like the organic nature of conversation and how one thing leads to another, but I also get frustrated when a historical thread goes off topic... So, here's my new thread to keep going on my current challenges: Ivan's Flash and PC-III Dialing In
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
You know I'm okay with the morph. I like how we progress through the next thing and the next. It ties things together. But its cool either way. Let me know if you want me to move the related posts from here into your new thread (date-sorted so they insert above your first post). Or leave them here 😉
 

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Let's leave them. The natural progression is good, but once I install my bump setup, I'll post it here to get it back on topic. At least the posts are tied together nicely with links (for as long as they last ;))
 

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Going back to ECU Bump configuration... has anyone tried to tie into channel 25 on the ECU instead of running a new ground wire?

Something like this:
Rectangle Slope Font Parallel Circle


Here's the unaltered view for reference with an arrow indicating what I did for visualization's sake:
Colorfulness Rectangle Product Slope Font


I've got my switch ready to be added, but haven't done it just yet when I stumbled across this potential solution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #68 ·
It's not worth the risk of back-feeding at key-off or other unintended consequences. Plus it adds another bit of open insulation needing periodic maintenance. It's simple enough to go by the instructions which are proven to not induce phantom hand grenades lol. The bump wiring mimics the Yamaha tech training steps, except they manually remove pins which is also a big risk.
 

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It's not worth the risk of back-feeding at key-off or other unintended consequences. Plus it adds another bit of open insulation needing periodic maintenance. It's simple enough to go by the instructions which are proven to not induce phantom hand grenades lol. The bump wiring mimics the Yamaha tech training steps, except they manually remove pins which is also a big risk.
I like that you're voice of calming reason. Thank you for being the good angel on my shoulder instead of the bad one that said, "Go for it! What's the worst that could happen? It'll work if you're careful!"
 

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Going back to ECU Bump configuration... has anyone tried to tie into channel 25 on the ECU instead of running a new ground wire?

Something like this:
...................

Here's the unaltered view for reference with an arrow indicating what I did for visualization's sake:
......................

I've got my switch ready to be added, but haven't done it just yet when I stumbled across this potential solution.
The hardwired Ground at Pin 25 is certainly an acceptable method for your proposed install and perhaps cleaner. If feedback was an issue there's no difference between the two methods as they are both chassis grounds. ;)
For a cleaner install you can extract Pin 25 from the ECU plug and branch the wire into the conductor, solder and shrink wrap and reinstall into the ECU plug. This is my methodology when I need to tap into a conductor on the Warrior :)
Branched wires shown below into the main machine harness for my COD & LEQ Patch.​
 

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The hardwired Ground at Pin 25 is certainly an acceptable method for your proposed install and perhaps cleaner. If feedback was an issue there's no difference between the two methods as they are both chassis grounds. ;)
For a cleaner install you can extract Pin 25 from the ECU plug and branch the wire into the conductor, solder and shrink wrap and reinstall into the ECU plug. This is my methodology when I need to tap into a conductor on the Warrior :)
Branched wires shown below into the main machine harness for my COD & LEQ Patch.​
[email protected] IT!! Thanks little devil for providing a solid counter argument! 🤣🤣

I hadn’t thought about fixing COD like this. SOLID follow up use for this approach.
 

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The hardwired Ground at Pin 25 is certainly an acceptable method for your proposed install and perhaps cleaner. If feedback was an issue there's no difference between the two methods as they are both chassis grounds. ;)
For a cleaner install you can extract Pin 25 from the ECU plug and branch the wire into the conductor, solder and shrink wrap and reinstall into the ECU plug. This is my methodology when I need to tap into a conductor on the Warrior :)
Branched wires shown below into the main machine harness for my COD & LEQ Patch.​
And it seems like they made it really easy to pull pins when needed. I used to do aircraft harness repair in the Marines and it wasn’t too bad so long as you had the right tool. I haven’t pulled pins on my Warrior but the instructions seem like it couldn’t be easier.
 

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I hadn’t thought about fixing COD like this. SOLID follow up use for this approach.
My COD & LEQ Patch Snap Connectors are done on the Main Machine Harness of the Taillight that have the Gold Tracing ;)
Warrior Blue & Black in the taillight harness
The N.O. contact can be used to switch a power outlet!
Shown above is a single pole double throw relay (SPDT) which isn't req'd for the task at hand. Any auto relay will suffice as you're using the coil of the relay in this circuit to bleed-off the residual voltage!

ADDED: Suggest removing the battery ground cable when working on the ECU pins
 
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