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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm having issues with my '02 Warrior and I was wondering if any of you know of a mechanic in the Phoenix Metro area (preferably East Valley) that knows these bikes inside and out. I have a great mechanic, but he's admittedly not an expert with these bikes. I need someone who really knows how these bikes are supposed to run / perform. Any suggestions?

Thank you in advance for any help with this.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks! Multiple issues, some of which have my mechanic slightly flummoxed.

1. Chatter in the front brakes at very low speeds. Already lubed up everything we could in the callipers. Fouled brake pads?
2. Minor intermittent clunk in the front end. Suspect either steering head or fork seals. Doesn't wobble when decelerating, so I'm leaning toward fork seals. No apparent leaks, tho.
3. Not running real smooth. Needs a fuel system work over.
4. Shifts kinda rough. Possible clutch adjustment or shift fork alignment. Hoping for something like the prior.
5. Vibrates pretty bad at high speeds. Suspects are front bearings or tire balance. Replacing both tires soon, so hopefully this will be taken care of then.

That should do, for starters. I might think of more later. It has very low miles (~9,000), but it spent a lot of the last few years in a garage. Seals may have dried out. Definitely has some varnished gas in the fuel injection. Somehow it ended up with a mismatched spark plug and wire - one different than the other three. Not sure what that's all about.

I haven't owned it very long and I'm really hoping this is a long term investment. I've dreamed of owning one since day one and I really don't want to miss something important that will end up sidelining it down the road if not taken care of now.
 

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1. The early models has a problem with the bushings that mount the brake line to the fender. Disconnect the brake line from the fender should do it. There is a thread around here that someone modded that mount as well.
2. On flat ground hold full front brake and push bike forward, bike not running. This will help you test the fork "squish" and see if the clunk is repeatable.
3. If there is varnished fuel in the system, once it is cleaned out it may smooth out. Also you may need to check the vacuum lines for leaks.
4. The clutch pull on these bikes is a beast. If you have not, you may need to adjust the cable for stretch.
5. The motor is solid mounted so you will naturally get some vibration. Once it is running smoothly it may diminish. Some say if you sync the throttle bodies it helps.
If you can post pics and as much more info about the bike as in other aftermarket parts, it will help us help you. Has your mech. checked if the recalls where done? I'm sure others will chime in here with more/ better info. These bikes are pretty bulletproof. Hope this helps. Post up any and all questions here in this thread so we can keep it all together for future info.
 

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yep unhook the brake line holders that attach to the fender, your brake vibration should go away.
would suggest investigating the mismatched plug wire. most people don't put 3 of one wire and one of another when swapping out coils etc. that's could make it run a little rough
 

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Agree with unhooking the brake line holders. The coils on this bike are hard wired. They don't disconnect from the plug wire.if you have a mismatched set then you have a problem.are they dynacoils or stock coils? You may have a bad connection which is causing it to run rough. I don't think there is a way to adjust the shift forks. But the pull on this clutch is enough that I have to adjust it almost monthly because of cable stretch. Run some sea foam through the bike and it should clear up the injectors and throttle bodies.

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Agree with unhooking the brake line holders. The coils on this bike are hard wired. They don't disconnect from the plug wire.if you have a mismatched set then you have a problem.are they dynacoils or stock coils? You may have a bad connection which is causing it to run rough. I don't think there is a way to adjust the shift forks. But the pull on this clutch is enough that I have to adjust it almost monthly because of cable stretch. Run some sea foam through the bike and it should clear up the injectors and throttle bodies.

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LD, what brand clutch cable are you using that you have to adjust monthly due to cable stretch? I have had my Barnett cable on my bike for a good while and never have to adjust it. Of course i have a Barnett clutch plate in there now so it might change since the Barnett has a stronger pull.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
2. On flat ground hold full front brake and push bike forward, bike not running. This will help you test the fork "squish" and see if the clunk is repeatable.
Tried that this morning. Can't replicate the clunk. Doesn't happen very often. Usually when I hit a sharp bump, like a pothole or something. Doesn't do it on speed bumps, for example.

If you can post pics and as much more info about the bike as in other aftermarket parts, it will help us help you. Has your mech. checked if the recalls where done? I'm sure others will chime in here with more/ better info. These bikes are pretty bulletproof. Hope this helps. Post up any and all questions here in this thread so we can keep it all together for future info.
I have a couple photos of the bike on my profile gallery. There aren't any performance modifications at all. All visible modifications are genuine Yamaha (handle-bars, windshield, chin-spoiler), except the mirrors. That's what the previous owner told me, anyway. He bought it brand new.

My mechanic works out of his garage, so I'll need to go into the dealership to have them check the status of the recalls. I seem to remember the previous owner saying he'd done the transmission recall, but I'll have the dealer check the VIN for all of them.

Agree with unhooking the brake line holders. The coils on this bike are hard wired. They don't disconnect from the plug wire.if you have a mismatched set then you have a problem.are they dynacoils or stock coils? You may have a bad connection which is causing it to run rough. I don't think there is a way to adjust the shift forks. But the pull on this clutch is enough that I have to adjust it almost monthly because of cable stretch. Run some sea foam through the bike and it should clear up the injectors and throttle bodies.
The brake line mounts feel pretty solid, but it appears to be a common issue, so I'll give it a shot.

As far as I know, the coils and wires are OEM. Once I found out that there was one that was mismatched, I considered replacing all 4. Do you recommend going with something like Dynacolis?

Adjusting the clutch cable was going to be the first thing I tried to clean up the shifting. It appears that several people on here prefer the Barretts clutch cable. Maybe I'll just go that route.

My last tank had Seafoam in it. Actually feels like it runs a little worse. That's why I'd like a mechanic that really knows these bikes to take a whack at it. I ride this to work every day. I need it to be reliable.
 

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I do all the work on my bike myself. I have heard Biker's Bay is reputable. But again, I do my own work and have not used them.

I'd be willing to meet up some weekend and let you try my bike to see if some of what you are noticing is just normal. The vibration disturbed me at first on this bike till I got used to it. And when I got mine the clutch and shifter adjustments were so far off the bike was scary to ride.. fixing those was my first thing before even riding home.

As for gas, unless it has High Compression pistons, use 87 octane. The bike runs better on the cheap stuff.

edit: Oh and be sure you check the oil level correctly, it isn't just a matter of pulling the dipstick:
https://www.starmotorcycles.com/star/service/viewservicetip.aspx?ls=star&yr=2003&lid=2&mid=61&tid=8
 

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I think dynacoils and new plug wires is a great investment. It pretty much doubles the spark, which seems to me to be a common sense mod everyone would want to do.

You wouldn't happen to have a fork bag would you? I had one, and when I hit a bump an Allen wrench I had in it put a dent in my front fender. So you might be having something like that happen if you do.

The brake line mounts probably are solid. That's the problem.

You should pull the tank, and check that none of your vacuum hoses has a crack in them, or that the throttle body boots don't have a crack in them.

But I'm still wondering about that plug wire. If you have stock coils, then someone replaced a plug wire. Which means they jerry rigged it because they don't come off. Which means they spliced something in. Which means you could be getting intermittent spark from that coil, which could be your problem. Probably not since you have 2 plugs per cylinder, but you never know. More than one member has also had the smaller gauge wires that screw to the coils come loose, so you could check that as well.
 

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Have you checked the front wheel bearings? Not a common problem but low speed brake chatter, clunking, and high speed vibrations kinda points to loose front wheel...loose rotor rivets, worn bearings...
 

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if it's been sitting, you need to also check the air filters to make sure nothing has built a home in there. and yeah, you need to get some pics of the plug wire. LD has it right. someone has done something to that wire, and for a bike that is all stock, it makes you ask "why". you can call yamaha corp. and give them the VIN. they'll tell you what's been done. new coils are a good idea but not "needed" if there's nothing wrong with the stock ones. at only 9000 miles there's likely nothing wrong that can't be fixed easily. and check your battey connections. at both ends. lots of posts about battery connections causing problems. also, when searching use the google search at the top of the page.
 

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If its not the front end then the 'Clunk' could actually be the top fuel tank bouncing. It could be the front mounts are loose, or it could be the rear bolted mount (there was a recall for the hardware that attaches the tank under the seat). If its the rear mount then use caution when repairing because if the tank gets pulled down too hard when bolting it down then it can rip the welded bracket off the underside of the tank. There's more info in the Recall forum, and the docs are in the Documentation forum in the recall thread.
 

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On the front brakes, in addition to what others have already mentioned, the front pads can become glazed during spirited down-mountain riding and some of the best roads where you live happen to run into the east mountain passes. I had that trouble while still there, worse in hot summer riding. I get it here sometimes too when running hard down the mountain passes it just builds-up. In any event, if the fender technique does not help then its probably glazed. In those cases I use wet-dry sandpaper 'dry' to remove the glaze and grime from both sides of both front rotors, and I also un-install the front pads and dry sand them flat.

For the pads I put the sandpaper on a concrete floor so its flat and the grit is facing up, then I rub the pad on the flat sandpaper making figure-8's until the dark glaze goes away.

For the rotors I use thin squares of plywood to make a flat base for the sandpaper to be sandwiched against both sides of a rotor same time, and I hold them with my hands nothing special there, then I spin the front wheel a few dozen complete revolutions so the sandpaper cleans off the crud. If there are deep grooves you need new rotors, they cannot be machined flat. I used to figure-8 them but gave up on it since it doesn't really achieve better braking when using sandpaper. On the rotors I start with a medium grit and finish with a fine grit, again nothing special. I keep everything dry, but when its all done I spray brake cleaner on a rag and use the rag to wipe down the rotors . . . being careful to avoid the caliper and the front wheel and any painted areas.

One big trouble these days is finding quality sand paper that will not tear apart in thirty seconds. Get the good stuff, you'll be glad you did.

One other thing, the front brakes have anti-vibration spring-steel pad holders, and if weak or missing then replace them it solves a lot. They are item #9 on the parts views, original 2002 part number 4SV−25919−00 and named 'SUPPORT, PAD'. Its a two minute swap.

After you are all finished, there's a thread around here someplace (or google 'brake bed') for how to 're-bed' the front pads. You can really only bed the fronts, or the rears, not both at the same time you need some pads available for a full stop. Follow those directions and most importantly since you are bedding the fronts remember that once the brake pads are fully heated stay off the front brake best you can, and when coming to a complete stop use only the rear brake. If the fully-heated pads remain in contact with the rotor as the speed becomes too slow or at a stop, then bits of hot pad resin will mark the rotors giving you a sticky spot. Guess what: those sticky spots are what causes that pesky vibration at very slow speeds as you decelerate to a stop. It feels 'gummy' because it is.

I've read a few member posts here that have good info, so a forum search should help too.
 

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Keeping this separate too:

May I ask at what speed the bike starts to vibrate badly? Mine gets jittery over 110-ish. It used to get jittery earlier but better air:fuel control improved things. Does your bike have a fuel manager (usually under the rider seat)? If it does you might disconnect it, your bike is amazingly stock.

Also, it might not matter but may I ask if this is your first V2 motorcycle? These differ from in-line motors. Its why we love 'em!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Dang... I've got a lot to catch up on. Thanks everyone for chiming in.

I'd be willing to meet up some weekend and let you try my bike to see if some of what you are noticing is just normal. The vibration disturbed me at first on this bike till I got used to it. And when I got mine the clutch and shifter adjustments were so far off the bike was scary to ride.. fixing those was my first thing before even riding home.

As for gas, unless it has High Compression pistons, use 87 octane. The bike runs better on the cheap stuff.

edit: Oh and be sure you check the oil level correctly, it isn't just a matter of pulling the dipstick:
https://www.starmotorcycles.com/star/service/viewservicetip.aspx?ls=star&yr=2003&lid=2&mid=61&tid=8
I really appreciate that, Lazn. I may just take you up on your offer. For gas, I've been using 91 octane, because that's what the original owner recommended. I don't have any reason to believe my pistons are high compression or anything other than normal. I guess I'll be switching to 87.

Thanks for the link to the oil level check video, as well.

I think dynacoils and new plug wires is a great investment. It pretty much doubles the spark, which seems to me to be a common sense mod everyone would want to do.

You wouldn't happen to have a fork bag would you? I had one, and when I hit a bump an Allen wrench I had in it put a dent in my front fender. So you might be having something like that happen if you do.

The brake line mounts probably are solid. That's the problem.

You should pull the tank, and check that none of your vacuum hoses has a crack in them, or that the throttle body boots don't have a crack in them.

But I'm still wondering about that plug wire. If you have stock coils, then someone replaced a plug wire. Which means they jerry rigged it because they don't come off. Which means they spliced something in. Which means you could be getting intermittent spark from that coil, which could be your problem. Probably not since you have 2 plugs per cylinder, but you never know. More than one member has also had the smaller gauge wires that screw to the coils come loose, so you could check that as well.
I'm going to look into those Dynacoils. I'm worried about that odd wire, as well. I may just replace all the wires, coils, and plugs with upgraded versions just to eliminate all suspects. At that point, I'll have my guy check all the vacuum lines, as well. Thanks for all the info.

Have you checked the front wheel bearings? Not a common problem but low speed brake chatter, clunking, and high speed vibrations kinda points to loose front wheel...loose rotor rivets, worn bearings...
I've suspected bearings for a while. I'm getting new tires soon. I'll have bearings checked when they do that.

On the front brakes, in addition to what others have already mentioned, the front pads can become glazed during spirited down-mountain riding and some of the best roads where you live happen to run into the east mountain passes. I had that trouble while still there, worse in hot summer riding. I get it here sometimes too when running hard down the mountain passes it just builds-up. In any event, if the fender technique does not help then its probably glazed. In those cases I use wet-dry sandpaper 'dry' to remove the glaze and grime from both sides of both front rotors, and I also un-install the front pads and dry sand them flat.
Brake pad contamination was a theory I had a while back, as well. It doesn't feel like the brake line mounts, all though I haven't ruled that out. I feel the chatter in the brake handle and the frame, as if the wheel is chattering, if that makes any sense. Contaminated brake pads would explain that. Thanks for the tip on how to resolve this.

Keeping this separate too:

May I ask at what speed the bike starts to vibrate badly? Mine gets jittery over 110-ish. It used to get jittery earlier but better air:fuel control improved things. Does your bike have a fuel manager (usually under the rider seat)? If it does you might disconnect it, your bike is amazingly stock.

Also, it might not matter but may I ask if this is your first V2 motorcycle? These differ from in-line motors. Its why we love 'em!
It vibrates pretty bad at 60-70 mph. I can't even imagine going 110. It vibrates so bad at 70 mph that I can't even use my mirrors. They're just a blur.

By fuel manager, are you referring to something like a Power Commander? If so, no, it's bone stock.

This isn't my first V-twin. It's my 4th, actually. All I've ever owned are V-twins, come to think of it. Even my sport bike (Suzuki SV650S). It is, however, my first belt drive.
 
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