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***PLEASE NOTE THAT THE METHODS I'VE USED BELOW WORKED FOR ME BUT AREN'T NECESSARILY THE BEST OR EASIEST WAY TO DO THE JOB. I ACCEPT NO LIABILITY WHAT-SO-EVER IF YOU END UP DAMAGING YOUR MOTORCYCLE OR YOURSELF USING THE PROCEDURES LISTED BELOW.

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After learning a hard lesson last night trying to hurry through my fork seal replacement I finally finished it up. While doing it I had to make some tools. Now these may have been discussed before but I thought it might be useful to others who may want to tackle this maintenance proceedure. This can be done in less than 2 hours if you're prepared.
First of all, I had one seal leaking. The service manual breaks down the complete fork assembly, but since my bike only has 7000 miles on it I only wanted to replace the oil seals, dust seals, and gaskets (crush washers). These are the part numbers I used and I believe they are universal for all Warriors.
(2) 4EB-23144-00-00 Dust Seal
(2) 4EB-23145-01-00 Oil Seal
(2) 2K8-23158-L0-00 Gasket (Crush Washer)
The service manual is a great reference for this repair. It can be done without it but I believe you're better off with one.

1) First remove the front fork covers. These are the plastic guards positioned on the front of the fork at the very bottom.
2) Remove the fender.
3) Remove the brake calipers.
4) Remove the pinch bolt (screw) in the bottom of the right fork assembly. It's there to pinch the bottom of that assermbly and lock in the front axle.
5) Remove the axle and front wheel.
6) Loosen the upper bracket (triple tree) pinch bolts.
7) While holding onto the fork, loosen the lower bracket pinch bolts and slide the fork assembly out.
Now you need to break loose the lower tube assembly from the upper. In the bottom of the fork you will see a socket screw down deep in the assembly. It's better to have an air operated tool to break these loose, but I was able to do it on a piece of carpet with the tools shown below.

3/8 drive ratchet
10 mm socket (deep-well preferred)
10 mm Hex Key with the bend cut off
1 piece of Schedule 40 PVC 1-1/2" ID


You simply insert the hey key into the socket screw head, then the 10 mm socket on it and the attach the 3/8" drive ratchet. You can do the following in a vise as shown in the service manual or you can try what I was successful with.
Since I didn't have air tools to break loose the socket screw in the bottom of the assembly, I simply layed it on a piece of carpet, placed a rag over the bottom of the assembly, placed my foot on the bottom of the assembly (black section) to steady it and simply stepped down quickly with my other foot on the ratchet. It broke loose. If this fails take it to a shop where they can simply break it loose for you but don't remove the screw until you're ready to drain the oil.

9) Next remove the screw, keeping that end upright, and then turn upside down to drain it into an oil pan. You'll need to work the fork assembly up and down to pump out all the oil.
10) Slide the lower assembly complete out.
11) On the upper assembly with a very thin flat tipped screwdriver, pry the dust seal {cover} out.
12) Next remove the retainer clip with the screwdriver.
13) Now you can pry out the old oil seal being very careful not scratch the inner walls of the assembly. Note before you remove the seal notice that the number/lettering on the seal faces down in the assembly. This is where I had my difficulty by placing the new ones in upside down.
14) Remove the washer just below the seal and clean it.

Now reassembly begins. (I flushed my assemblies once with fresh fork oil once before I started reassembly and then wiped everything down with a clean cloth)
15) Reinstall washer
16) I used electrical tape on the end of my chrome fork tube to avoid damaging the dust seal or the oil seal when installed. You could also use a small sandwich bag.
17) Oil down the chrome fork tube and put white lithium grease on the inside of the new fork seal
18) Reinstall the washer.
19) Now slide the new fork seal on the tube. Make sure the side with number/letters goes on first. As you're sliding it on do it in a circular motion. This will help avoid damaging the seal. You will notice two holes in the chrome tube. Continue the circular motion as you move the seal down the tube and past the holes to the bottom.
20) Next with the dust seal and the oil seal located at the bottom of the chrome fork tube, insert the tube into the upper assembly. It will slide down so far and probably stop. Simply turn it and it will eventually drop down another step. Now there may be one more step to drop before the damper rod assembly is completely down to it's lowest position.
21) Now you're going to seat the seal with the special tool that the manual says you need. This is where your section of PVC comes in. Take your PVC and cuta section out of it so you can snap it onto your chrome fork tube. Once you've mastered that, remove it and grind a relief in one end on the ID. That way the PVC ID does not touch the fork tube as it contacts the seal. If you attempt to seat the oil seal with the PVC as it is, you'll damage the seal. You can grind this relief with a Dremel tool or a rounded file. You need to relieve about 1/4". There's photo below that shows the relief. Hopefully you can see it.

Snap it back on the tube and slide it down against the seal. Tap the PVC top edge with a rubber mallet a few times then slide the PVC around 180 degrees and repeat the tapping process. Remove the PVC.
22) Now reinstall the retainer clip.
23) Slide the dust seal down the tube and with the rubber mallet tap it lightly into place.
24) Next we're going to refill the tube with fork oil. You're going to need a funnel with a tube on the end of it to get the oil down into the hole at the bottom of the fork tube assembly. Extend the assembly until the two holes in the chrome fork tube are just above the dust seal. Snap the PVC back onto the chrome fork tube with the relieved end facing away from the dust seal. Locate it about 1/2" above the two holes in tube. Now slide the assembly back together until the holes disappear and the PVC contacts the dust seal. The PVC will prevent the fork assembly from moving while your putting in the oil. See photo below.

Place the funnel (with the tube end) in the bottom hole and slowly pour the oil into the assembly.
25) Next remove the PVC and slowly slide the chrome tube assembly back into the upper. It may bottom out prematurely but you'll be able to tell when you place the screw back into the bottom of the tube.
26) Place the screw (with new crush washer) in the bottom of the tube. Take the "cut off" 10 mm hex key and turn until the screw until it's finger tight. If the screw won't catch the threads the fork assembly isn't completely together. Simply rotate the chrome tube assembly until it drops down another inch or so. Once the screw is finger tight use the ratchet and socket to snug it up. You'll notice that you can only get it so tight before it starts moving. At this point you can use the vise again or the foot method I used above to snug it further. If you feel uncomfortable with this, take the assemblies to a shop and have them snug it up with an air tool.
26) Reassemble the bike in reverse order of disassembly.
27) Take a test ride to check the handling and make sure you have no leaks.
Hopefully this will take away some of the fear of replacing your fork seals. I should definitely save you some $$$$/

And as I stated eariler, I ACCEPT NO LIABILITY WHAT-SO-EVER IF YOU END UP DAMAGING YOUR MOTORCYCLE OR YOURSELF USING THE PROCEDURES LISTED ABOVE.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I can'tremember exactlyhow much oil goes into each tube, but you can either refer to the service manual or call you Yamaha dealer for that info. I believe it is 16.1 oz but don't quote me on that. Also you will want to use the specified Yamaha01 Fork Oilfor the Warrior.
 

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Great info thanks:} I think it's 467ml or, for me, half a liter in each fork leg. I can't tell the overfilling of 16.5ml:}
 

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I discovered you dont just "remove the front tire"

You have to have a 18 or 19mm to remove the axle THEN remove the tire
 

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I hope you didn't buy a new low use socket. There are several alternatives to the socket like the drive end of a spark plug socket or a chissel and adjustable wrench.
 

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UPDATE

My warrior has almost 30,000 miles.

The left side fork started leaking recently. My plan was to replace the fork oil, oil seals and dust cover/ seals.

I used a 5/8" spark plug sockets reverse side to remove the axle and it worked like a champ, Thanks!

But I've run into a snag.

I got the right side fork oil plug out fine using the above method. (I dont have air tools.

But the left side is giving me fits.

Seems the inards of the fork are turning with the bolt.... therefore I can't break it loose.

I wonder if this could be an indicator there's something wrong with the left fork?

Or did I just get lucky with the right side?

My plan at this point is to take it to a local shop and see if an air tool will do the trick.

Anyone have this issue?
 

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Paul said:
UPDATE


My warrior has almost 30,000 miles.


The left side fork started leaking recently. My plan was to replace the fork oil, oil seals and dust cover/ seals.


I used a 5/8" spark plug sockets reverse side to remove the axle and it worked like a champ, Thanks!


But I've run into a snag.


I got the right side fork oil plug out fine using the above method. (I dont have air tools.


But the left side is giving me fits.


Seems the inards of the fork are turning with the bolt.... therefore I can't break it loose.

[*]Adjust - Increase the fork spring preload (CW) to prevent the parts from turning. If this doesn't work you'll need to use an impact![/list]


I wonder if this could be an indicator there's something wrong with the left fork?

[*]No[/list]


Or did I just get lucky with the right side?


My plan at this point is to take it to a local shop and see if an air tool will do the trick.


Anyone have this issue?
 

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Thanks for the quick reply Alan.

I adjusted the preload to the max tight setting of 1 and tried again.

It does feel tighter, but still wont break loose..

Oh well, worth a shot.

maybe I'll go up to sears and look at some compressors, this isnt the first time Ive needed an impact wrench, I need to suck it up and get one....just that that always opens up a whole nother can of worms with new tools and accessories...Im sure you guys know what im talkin about.

My luck im doing this on memorial day weekend when just about everything is closed.

I'll post and update later. Thanks fellow warrior brothers!
 

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Update:


A local shop let me use their air tool to break loose the Fork oil drain bolt.


Zipped it right off, no problem.


Got the seals, crush washer & dust cover replaced and filled up with new fork oil, no problem.


The manual says the fork oil drain bolts should have 29 ft lbs of torque.


I couldn't get butapprox 12ftlbsof torquebeforefork internalsstart turning with the bolt.


I didn't feel comfortable wit that soI wentback up to the local shop and borrowedtheir air tool 1 more time.


It's worth the piece of mind.


Got everything back together, feels good!


No leaks that I can see


will test drive later tonight.
 

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I believe that my left lower seal is leaking, I consistently have a drip in my garage and have oil ALL over my brake. I'm going to the dragon two weeks from this past Friday and really want to get this resolved before I leave. I'm just a bit nervous about doing this before a big trip...You guys think that I should try it or just wait until after. Am I looking at the potential for catastrophic failure if I leave it? What happens if the shock runs completely out of oil? Also, are the parts listed earlier in this post really the only seals that I need, or will I get caught with my pants down before a big trip. Thanks for your advice!
 

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You absolutely need to do it before you go. It is already at a dangerous condition for any riding... let alone Dragon riding.

I just had same thing happen on one of our bikes . I took the forks off (not hard) and bought the parts (Dust covers were real expensive here for some reason)(Crush washer and seal weren't bad price).
Anyway, the I went into a shop where I know them a bit and got to watch how they do it as I don't have the tool for seating the seal. He did both forks and charged me .8 hrs so about $60 bucks. Next time I might try to make a tool and do it myself ... now that I've seen it done once.
 

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You absolutely need to do it before you go. It is already at a dangerous condition for any riding... let alone Dragon riding.

I just had same thing happen on one of our bikes . I took the forks off (not hard) and bought the parts (Dust covers were real expensive here for some reason)(Crush washer and seal weren't bad price).
Anyway, the I went into a shop where I know them a bit and got to watch how they do it as I don't have the tool for seating the seal. He did both forks and charged me .8 hrs so about $60 bucks. Next time I might try to make a tool and do it myself ... now that I've seen it done once.
Thanks for the advice! I'm going to try and get this done, hopefully I can get the parts in soon enough.
 
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