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From Ford-diesel.com

K&N Letter to The Editor
Source:
Richard Blum
[email protected]


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
This was a letter sent to the Editor at Ford-Diesel.com from Mr. Rick Blum, K&N Engineering Technical Support Supervisor. This letter was sent to help counter misinformation and conjecture that was observed on the Ford-Diesel.com forums concerning the K&N air filtration line.

Dear sir,

I work at K&N Engineering and have been receiving a lot of questions regarding our product's integrity, reliability, and effectiveness from information posted in the Ford-Diesel.comforums. It seems these forums contain a lot of opinions and not a lot of scientific testing or factual data. I would like to provide some information to you and your readers regarding the K&N product line.

K&N filters are tested by an outside, independent laboratory, Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Tx. They have been proven to stop at least 99% of particles on a SAE dust test. This test uses a range of particles from the 0 - 5 micron range up to 20 microns. For comparison sake, a paper filter stops 99% on the same test and the OEM minimum standard is 96%. Foam is generally the worst media with a typical efficiency rating of 80 - 85%. To get higher ratings, the foam must be more dense and consequently more restrictive. The "tack" characteristic of a K&N allows for increased filtration without loss of airflow.

The testing procedure used is SAE J-726 using ISO Test Dust. This test is the standard of the air filter industry. The test procedure consists of flowing air through the filter at a constant rate (airflow rate is determined by the application) while feeding test dust into the air stream at a rate of 1 gram per cubic meter of air. As the filter loads with dust the pressure drop across the filter is increased to maintain the prescribed airflow rate. The test is continued until the pressure drop increases 10" H2O above the initial restriction of the clean element (in this case .78" to 10.78" H2O). At this point the test is terminated. The dirty filter element is then weighed. This weight is compared to the clean element weight to determine the total Dust Capacity. The amount of dust retained by the filter is divided by the total amount of dust fed during the test to determine the Cumulative Efficiency.

* The K&N filter achieved the following results:
Dust Capacity 305 Grams
K&N Cumulative Efficiency 99.05 %


*Links to the filtration tests are on the K&N web site at:
http://www.knfilters.com/images/factstab1.gif
http://www.knfilters.com/images/factstab2.gif

So, what this proves is that you really cannot arrive at any intelligent conclusions by holding the filter to the light. That inspection is useless, pin holes are normal. In fact, those pin holes are what makes a K&N filter efficient. Within those holes, there are actually hundreds of microscopic fibers spanning them. When treated with oil, these fibers capture and hold the very fine particles. On the same hand, the fibers allow the filter to flow more air than paper or foam. Additionally, we have to understand that oiled fibers are translucent and are not easily visible to the naked eye. Spray some WD 40 on a sheet of white paper and you will see the effect. The K&N filter is four-ply cotton gauze unlike some competitors synthetic material filters. The synthetic material filters do not have the very small fibers that natural cotton does. Also, the oil in a K&N is completely absorbed into the media and there is no risk of contaminating electronic sensors as there is with Foam filters that can have oil pulled from the soaked media.

K&N got started over 30 years ago making filters for motorcycles and off road racers. The filters did so well that these customers wanted similar filters for their cars and trucks. K&N started making filters for these applications and here we are today making filters for just about any application on the market. If our filters did not work, we would not be in business growing every year.

K&N makes filters for Chrysler/Mopar, Ford Motorsports, Edelbrock, Rotax Engines, and Harley Davidson. K&N filters come as original equipment on the 2000 Ford Mustang Cobra-R. K&N even made filters for the Apache helicopters used in Desert Storm because of maintenance problems with the original paper design. If K&N filters work in these conditions they will work for you.


Thanks,

Rick Blum
Technical Support Supervisor, K&N Engineering
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Here is a YouTube channel in which he tests everything and is super thorough. Here is one on air filters
So the guy from K&N in that article I posted is lying through his teeth......or that guy's test in the video with flour paints a wrong picture... I don't know anymore what and who to believe..
 

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So the guy from K&N in that article I posted is lying through his teeth......or that guy's test in the video with flour paints a wrong picture... I don't know anymore what and who to believe..
I didnt watch the videos but in my opinion k&n filters are for slightly more air flow and less filtering and more noise.

I think of you want the best filtering stick with oem filter. But I like more noise and red color hahha

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

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So the guy from K&N in that article I posted is lying through his teeth......or that guy's test in the video with flour paints a wrong picture... I don't know anymore what and who to believe..
Run different filters on your ride and test them to see what gives a better performance for your needs and stick with whichever one works best for you. Watching and reading about best product application is one thing but to test things out for yourself, you learn more that way.
 

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The posted letter from K&N is about an industry standard test sequence. If you belay knee-jerk reactions and give it some thought you will realize the standard test sequence is a real world test of cumulative efficiency using real particles.

The video is designed and sequenced to give preference to paper filters (dry media). There is no other possible reason to use flour. Do you drive through flour clouds, or dust clouds? Flour and moisture (oil) create an unfair test condition (and a sticky mess) that has nothing to do with real world conditions.

Also, you need to remember that cars are designed differently. Intake-restricted motors are the norm and sensor arrays do the work.

Notice that in the non-flour video sequences the K&N scored highest including in counted-particle retention, and also scored the highest on airflow (only bested by the no-filter number).

Air filters do not manufacture horsepower. If a motor is low-power design then any air filter will do, and any single-vehicle-speed-test will yield almost exactly the same numbers across the board. But run the same test using a high-power and high-rev motor where the quantity of air is taxing the air filter, and guess what: the paper filters all fall short. Oh. Except in flour storms.

Smaller diameter pistons with about the same stroke gulp far less air and place far less demand on filter media.

The Warrior's almost 4-inch diameter slugs pump massive amounts of air compared to most motorbikes. The cheap paper filters become pin-holed if not changed before they plug-up with real-world dirt and dust. The good paper filters use better medium (filter material) and fare better: when they plug-up they lose very little filter material as they fail. Only K&N filters are literally wire-woven.

Most everyone here could go on-and-on too, like me, but the video tests are unscientific and the way the technology they deployed is used is sad. They had the tools to be scientific but did not have the knowledge of how to design science experiments.

But they don't need that knowledge. That video was never intended to be fair. It was just another paper-filter-media industry attack. When they lose market share they fall back on smoke and mirrors hiding their K&N attacks.

In years passed I spent a lot of time in a factory complex near Phoenix AZ where Boeing built military attack copters. They used very large K&N's. Nothing else could protect the motor while gulping the amount of air required. If K&N's had not existed . . . well . . . all that type air support would not have existed.

There are about a million really good working-guides about designing experiments for mechanical devices and systems. There are a couple hundred thousand guides for designing experiments for systems requiring airflow filtration. There are hundreds for gas motors.
 

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There are tons of articles and videos out there. If you want to go deeper into the rabbit's hole then you can look up AFE filters, AEM filters, S&B.......
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The posted letter from K&N is about an industry standard test sequence. If you belay knee-jerk reactions and give it some thought you will realize the standard test sequence is a real world test of cumulative efficiency using real particles.

The video is designed and sequenced to give preference to paper filters (dry media). There is no other possible reason to use flour. Do you drive through flour clouds, or dust clouds? Flour and moisture (oil) create an unfair test condition (and a sticky mess) that has nothing to do with real world conditions.

Also, you need to remember that cars are designed differently. Intake-restricted motors are the norm and sensor arrays do the work.

Notice that in the non-flour video sequences the K&N scored highest including in counted-particle retention, and also scored the highest on airflow (only bested by the no-filter number).

Air filters do not manufacture horsepower. If a motor is low-power design then any air filter will do, and any single-vehicle-speed-test will yield almost exactly the same numbers across the board. But run the same test using a high-power and high-rev motor where the quantity of air is taxing the air filter, and guess what: the paper filters all fall short. Oh. Except in flour storms.

Smaller diameter pistons with about the same stroke gulp far less air and place far less demand on filter media.

The Warrior's almost 4-inch diameter slugs pump massive amounts of air compared to most motorbikes. The cheap paper filters become pin-holed if not changed before they plug-up with real-world dirt and dust. The good paper filters use better medium (filter material) and fare better: when they plug-up they lose very little filter material as they fail. Only K&N filters are literally wire-woven.

Most everyone here could go on-and-on too, like me, but the video tests are unscientific and the way the technology they deployed is used is sad. They had the tools to be scientific but did not have the knowledge of how to design science experiments.

But they don't need that knowledge. That video was never intended to be fair. It was just another paper-filter-media industry attack. When they lose market share they fall back on smoke and mirrors hiding their K&N attacks.

In years passed I spent a lot of time in a factory complex near Phoenix AZ where Boeing built military attack copters. They used very large K&N's. Nothing else could protect the motor while gulping the amount of air required. If K&N's had not existed . . . well . . . all that type air support would not have existed.

There are about a million really good working-guides about designing experiments for mechanical devices and systems. There are a couple hundred thousand guides for designing experiments for systems requiring airflow filtration. There are hundreds for gas motors.
Thanks for that great feedback Arizona....It all makes total sense to me what you are saying. I'm not even really worried about gaining any performance, to me it's more the worry of getting more dirt into my engine wit K&N but you have put that to rest...thanx. I am sure of the many Warriors here that have attained high mileage like over 100,000 miles quite a few must be running K&N filters. Would like to hear some of those owners chime in here. Are you running K&N's by the way?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
There are tons of articles and videos out there. If you want to go deeper into the rabbit's hole then you can look up AFE filters, AEM filters, S&B.......
Thanks Hefty...I did and I'm now saturated like a well used air filter ;)
 

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Thanks for that great feedback Arizona....It all makes total sense to me what you are saying. I'm not even really worried about gaining any performance, to me it's more the worry of getting more dirt into my engine wit K&N but you have put that to rest...thanx. I am sure of the many Warriors here that have attained high mileage like over 100,000 miles quite a few must be running K&N filters. Would like to hear some of those owners chime in here. Are you running K&N's by the way?

Absolutely yes I run K&N's and have for over a decade on my Warrior. You can see them noted in the header of my posts, plus here:

Additionally I recently posted pics of my VBAK with RC1290 K&N's for you in your questions in your air pressure sensor thread. This link jumps straight to my post for your convenience:

You posted in a prior thread that you have trouble finding certain air filters in your country. Several members have tried to help you by making suggestions. I saw you ordered filters so that us good. There is no need for you to worry or negatively comment about any air filter option available to you in your country.

You said that performance is not your top priority and there are many who agree with you. So you could stay with the stock intake set-up and filters. If you cannot find those filters then do a hardware store DIY-BAK and you can run good quality paper cone filters just fine. Be certain to keep spares on-hand.

Remember how this conversation started. I'm not selling one or the other here. Good quality paper or K&N's will do the deed. Just perform maintenance at appropriate intervals. Buy what your country has available to you. Or install the K&N's you ordered. Either way, maintain you intake airflow protection.

I am adding links to your air pressure sensor thread and your related air filter thread just to make it easier in the future for others to follow along and to know how the conversation got started. As a group, these threads are related and communicate important information to consider when contemplating certain mods, or when having certain troubles with intakes/sensors.

Here are links to follow-along:


 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Absolutely yes I run K&N's and have for over a decade on my Warrior. You can see them noted in the header of my posts, plus here:

Additionally I recently posted pics of my VBAK with RC1290 K&N's for you in your questions in your air pressure sensor thread. This link jumps straight to my post for your convenience:

You posted in a prior thread that you have trouble finding certain air filters in your country. Several members have tried to help you by making suggestions. I saw you ordered filters so that us good. There is no need for you to worry or negatively comment about any air filter option available to you in your country.

You said that performance is not your top priority and there are many who agree with you. So you could stay with the stock intake set-up and filters. If you cannot find those filters then do a hardware store DIY-BAK and you can run good quality paper cone filters just fine. Be certain to keep spares on-hand.

Remember how this conversation started. I'm not selling one or the other here. Good quality paper or K&N's will do the deed. Just perform maintenance at appropriate intervals. Buy what your country has available to you. Or install the K&N's you ordered. Either way, maintain you intake airflow protection.

I am adding links to your air pressure sensor thread and your related air filter thread just to make it easier in the future for others to follow along and to know how the conversation got started. As a group, these threads are related and communicate important information to consider when contemplating certain mods, or when having certain troubles with intakes/sensors.

Here are links to follow-along:


Right Arizona...thanks very much. Some more related points...In my country any filters that fit the stock airbox are not available as regular stock items. Either Yamaha dealers have to order from overseas or I can order myself from E-bay or Amazon or any other place overseas that has them in stock. So shipping costs come into play and are always a consideration when ordering.
My choice of air filter set-up is determined by whether I can run it without having to install a PC3 or PC5 or whatever as I don't want to get into the technicalities of all the various settings and how to determine the optimum setting for any particular air filter set-up. I want to keep it all as basic and simple as possible. I don't even really want to do the ECU Bump thing either although that doesn't sound too involved and I might just consider doing that at some stage. Might have to do it it anyway if my bike turns out to be running lean or rich at some stage. But that's another story on it's own again. I am going to check my plugs soon to see how they are burning. If a bike runs just right and the plugs burn just right and one does not change or adjust any settings then will a bike keep on running right or can other factors cause it to start running to lean or to rich?

So about the Hardware store DIY-BAK you mention: Thats the one without the velocity stacks where the airfilter cones just get attached straight onto the throttle bodies. Can that be done without a ECU Bump? And what does one do with the 3 sensors that are involved? Do they have to be relocated and where does one relocate them to? Are there any other things that need to be relocated such as coils or anything? Also does this DIY-BAK require the AIS removal or not. I don't want to remove the AIS if I don't have to.
And that I think covers it Arizona...can't think of any more questions as regards all this at the moment.
Thanks again for your feedback Arizona and I hope that this post and the links you added help some other Warrior brothers with similar thoughts and questions in future as well.
 

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I don't have a lot of experience in using K&N filters. Only 80 thousand kilometers with filters from this manufacturer (half of your request). But for me personally, this is enough. Filters have proven themselves from the best side. After buying the previous bike(which always leads to some hidden part of its history, if it's not a purchase from the factory) I noticed contamination inside the intake box. And this is provided that regular paper filters are used. The throttle bodies were also dirty. I washed everything and after that the dirt problem did not come back. And when I replaced the paper filters with K&N filters, I washed the intake to a shine again. And after that everything became even cleaner. I don't know how to explain this. But the main thing for me is that it hasn't become dirtier!))

And I rided along russian roads. It's dusty here. Plus, in 2016-2017, the city was under construction to prepare for the World Cup.
The previous bike, with a total mileage of 115 thousand kilometers, of which 50 thousand were with K&N filters, had the this cylinder walls:



Compression was normal, there was no oil consumption.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
I don't have a lot of experience in using K&N filters. Only 80 thousand kilometers with filters from this manufacturer (half of your request). But for me personally, this is enough. Filters have proven themselves from the best side. After buying the previous bike(which always leads to some hidden part of its history, if it's not a purchase from the factory) I noticed contamination inside the intake box. And this is provided that regular paper filters are used. The throttle bodies were also dirty. I washed everything and after that the dirt problem did not come back. And when I replaced the paper filters with K&N filters, I washed the intake to a shine again. And after that everything became even cleaner. I don't know how to explain this. But the main thing for me is that it hasn't become dirtier!))

And I rided along russian roads. It's dusty here. Plus, in 2016-2017, the city was under construction to prepare for the World Cup.
The previous bike, with a total mileage of 115 thousand kilometers, of which 50 thousand were with K&N filters, had the this cylinder walls:



Compression was normal, there was no oil consumption.


Thanks for sharing that Freeez...that is just what I wanted to hear :) that is **** fantastic.....большое тебе спасибо
I found this post by you as well :) Did you use just ordinary gasoline to clean them? What oil did you use to re-oil them?


Yesterday for the first time this year I served the intake system.
At first the picture looked sad. The filters were **** dirty!




And this after just 4700km! I got ready for bad news.




But things were much better. On the back of the filters were clean. Dirt did not pass through them!




I cleaned them with a some kind of gasoline, all the dirt was easily washed off and only the poplar fluff remains. I blowed out it by air.




Then filters were soaked with oil, I checked the cleanliness of the supply pipes. In them clean too. Probably it was necessary to completely remove them and check the purity of the throttle, but I did not have a cleaning agent with me and cleaning the throttles with an aerosol agent would contaminate the spark plugs. I also didn’t have spark plugs with me. I think everything is fine there!




What conclusions did I draw?




I am very pleased with the quality of the K&N filter. They work! And I am glad that I replaced filters Moxi with filters KN. As I have already said, in our conditions, we need to focus on intake system issues.

And also, I would swap the sensors on the mounting plate from VBAK. One sensor interferes with the filter housing. I turned a plate a little.

Burn the Guzzolene!
Burn the tires! :D
 

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I'll get right to it.
Video boy needs prozac.
As AZW stated flour test = zero.
0 to 60 times in a 3 ton truck with an auto trans = no discernable data from that series of "tests" other than the test vehicle is a gas guzzling slug.
If comping filter air flow the tests need to be preformed back to back on an engine or chassis dyno.
A by product of combustion is carbon it builds up in cylinders & will flake off & blow out without damage.
Air filters need to keep birds, rocks, small children & SAND out of your engine.

Engine masters did a dyno air filter comp on a cage engine it was more about the design of the filter housing than the filter media but non the less its an interesting 15 minute vid,

 
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Discussion Starter #15
I'll get right to it.
Video boy needs prozac.
As AZW stated flour test = zero.
0 to 60 times in a 3 ton truck with an auto trans = no discernable data from that series of "tests" other than the test vehicle is a gas guzzling slug.
If comping filter air flow the tests need to be preformed back to back on an engine or chassis dyno.
A by product of combustion is carbon it builds up in cylinders & will flake off & blow out without damage.
Air filters need to keep birds, rocks, small children & SAND out of your engine.

Engine masters did a dyno air filter comp on a cage engine it was more about the design of the filter housing than the filter media but non the less its an interesting 15 minute vid,

Very interesting...thanks Church
 

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Did you use just ordinary gasoline to clean them? What oil did you use to re-oil them?
Not quite ordinary gasoline. This is closer to white spirit(Stoddard solvent). For oiling I use K&N aerosol. The fact is that for conical filters the average consumption of K&H oil and the convenience of impregnation suits me - it lasts for a many service-times. But I doubt that flushing the K&N will be enough for me even a couple of times.

Additionally, now I use special K&H nylon covers, which are worn over the filters and the dirt on the filters settles less.
 

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I'll get right to it.
Video boy needs prozac.
As AZW stated flour test = zero.
0 to 60 times in a 3 ton truck with an auto trans = no discernable data from that series of "tests" other than the test vehicle is a gas guzzling slug.
If comping filter air flow the tests need to be preformed back to back on an engine or chassis dyno.
A by product of combustion is carbon it builds up in cylinders & will flake off & blow out without damage.
Air filters need to keep birds, rocks, small children & SAND out of your engine.

Engine masters did a dyno air filter comp on a cage engine it was more about the design of the filter housing than the filter media but non the less its an interesting 15 minute vid,

I love that guy from Roadkill Garage.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Freeezzz said:
Quote"But I doubt that flushing the K&N will be enough for me even a couple of times" Unquote
Not sure I quite understand what you mean by this
 

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Right Arizona...thanks very much. Some more related points...In my country any filters that fit the stock airbox are not available as regular stock items. Either Yamaha dealers have to order from overseas or I can order myself from E-bay or Amazon or any other place overseas that has them in stock. So shipping costs come into play and are always a consideration when ordering.
My choice of air filter set-up is determined by whether I can run it without having to install a PC3 or PC5 or whatever as I don't want to get into the technicalities of all the various settings and how to determine the optimum setting for any particular air filter set-up. I want to keep it all as basic and simple as possible. I don't even really want to do the ECU Bump thing either although that doesn't sound too involved and I might just consider doing that at some stage. Might have to do it it anyway if my bike turns out to be running lean or rich at some stage. But that's another story on it's own again. I am going to check my plugs soon to see how they are burning. If a bike runs just right and the plugs burn just right and one does not change or adjust any settings then will a bike keep on running right or can other factors cause it to start running to lean or to rich?

So about the Hardware store DIY-BAK you mention: Thats the one without the velocity stacks where the airfilter cones just get attached straight onto the throttle bodies. Can that be done without a ECU Bump? And what does one do with the 3 sensors that are involved? Do they have to be relocated and where does one relocate them to? Are there any other things that need to be relocated such as coils or anything? Also does this DIY-BAK require the AIS removal or not. I don't want to remove the AIS if I don't have to.
And that I think covers it Arizona...can't think of any more questions as regards all this at the moment.
Thanks again for your feedback Arizona and I hope that this post and the links you added help some other Warrior brothers with similar thoughts and questions in future as well.
As stated in other responses among your several related threads:

Just changing air filters does not required retune. No sensor issues either.

For help with air sensors, see the service manual plus see the table of contents inside the Documentation forum for an entry about having trouble after doing a BAK or VBAK and study that pdf.

The bike is sensor managed and features error-code reporting (service manual). Its robust.

If you change intake AND exhaust its good to remove the AIS. Its job is to inject fresh air into the exhaust so the exiting flame can burn more exhaust gas. Its a terrible solution. It pops and bangs and removing it can actually improve fuel mileage meaning its burning better. But its your call. The giant exhaust can is there to muffle the pops and bangs induced by the AIS.

The ECU Bump is one potential solution to fuel management but it only affects up to 1100~1300rpm. However, if only changing filters then its not needed. If installing any form of BAK or VBAK then ECU Bump by one or two points rich can sometimes help. If installing full exhaust and any form of BAK or VBAK then get a fuel manager, or get Ivan's and see how it goes because Ivan reports that some modified warriors tend to run great with no fuel manager. Maybe yours will. If not, get a fuel manager too.

Search sensor relocation plates.

For everything else see responses in your related threads.

You are asking good questions. You are ready to begin reading the service manual and also ready to begin searching the forum and reading as many full threads as possible so you learn to judge if information applies to your exact question. I think when you get that going you have the potential to become a valuable resource here. Good work.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
As stated in other responses among your several related threads:

Just changing air filters does not required retune. No sensor issues either.

For help with air sensors, see the service manual plus see the table of contents inside the Documentation forum for an entry about having trouble after doing a BAK or VBAK and study that pdf.

The bike is sensor managed and features error-code reporting (service manual). Its robust.

If you change intake AND exhaust its good to remove the AIS. Its job is to inject fresh air into the exhaust so the exiting flame can burn more exhaust gas. Its a terrible solution. It pops and bangs and removing it can actually improve fuel mileage meaning its burning better. But its your call. The giant exhaust can is there to muffle the pops and bangs induced by the AIS.

The ECU Bump is one potential solution to fuel management but it only affects up to 1100~1300rpm. However, if only changing filters then its not needed. If installing any form of BAK or VBAK then ECU Bump by one or two points rich can sometimes help. If installing full exhaust and any form of BAK or VBAK then get a fuel manager, or get Ivan's and see how it goes because Ivan reports that some modified warriors tend to run great with no fuel manager. Maybe yours will. If not, get a fuel manager too.

Search sensor relocation plates.

For everything else see responses in your related threads.

You are asking good questions. You are ready to begin reading the service manual and also ready to begin searching the forum and reading as many full threads as possible so you learn to judge if information applies to your exact question. I think when you get that going you have the potential to become a valuable resource here. Good work.
Hiya Arizona...great feedback and much appreciated and thanks for the compliment as well ;)
Some points I need to mention with regards to your feedback. OK I haven't got that big watercooler exchaust...I have custom made straight through pipes which basically were made utilising the stock headers and replacing the watercooler with 2 straight sections welded to the original headers and then heat wrapped (see attached image) I don't know if they adjusted the ECU but somehow I don't think so. By the way those pipes were on the bike when I purchased it...the previous owner removed the watercooler and had the custom pipes made and fitted so I don't know if they adjusted the ECU but somehow I don't think so. I did ask and I think he said no it wasn't needed. Bike runs well and does not pop or backfire on de-acelleration.
251626


You mention the following: Quote"The ECU Bump is one potential solution to fuel management but it only affects up to 1100~1300rpm" Unquote
That leads to the following 2 questions:
A. That is very interesting, I was under the impression that it affected the entire rpm range. So then if you are running lean or rich adjusting the ECU will not solve the problem at highway cruising speeds? Then what will?
B. If one takes one's Warrior to a Yamaha Workshop with a complaint that the bike runs too lean or too rich does Yamaha then use the same ECU-BUMP method as a fix as is described on this forum in various posts? Is that when they flash your ECU with a scan tool?
C. Will removing the AIS but keeping the stock airbox with stock airfilters (K&N replacements) and running the pipes that I have necessitate a ECU-BUMP?

I also read the following post and noted your response and also Churchkeys response. Two opposing views...which is then the correct one?
And so from the forums I also learned that the ECU-BUMP is the same thing Yamaha technicians do when they flash the ECU with a scan tool. But that would mean that if we assume that the notion that ECU Bump only affects idling rpm and not the higher rpm range is correct then flashing the ECU with a scan tool is also only going to affect the idling rpm range and not the higher rpm range. So that then begs the question how do the Yamaha technicians correct a Warrior that is running lean or rich at higher rpm's?
ECU Bump Busted

Thanks once again Arizona...I appreciate you assisting me with my learning process.
 
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