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Snapped the first one at the end of May. Bought the Barnett clutch cable SKU #101-90-10012. Received it, LUBED it up, and installed it at the beginning of June.
Over the past two weeks or so, I felt a little give in the clutch but not enough where I felt it needed to be tightened. Then today there was more slack and thought to myself that I should tighten it this week. 5 minutes after the thought went through my went, it snapped. Luckily I was two blocks from my house. So no tow needed but this is not right. On both cables the snap occurred in the clutch lever.

Has anyone else had this problem??


May 30th snap
E7D36B10-2F12-4A94-9941-1A80C2AFFFB3_1_105_c.jpeg


August 12 snap
IMG_3674.jpeg
 

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04+ Warrior 101-90-10012 is on the list:

Ref for 02-03 is: Yamaha 1700 Road Star Warrior (2002-2003) - Barnett Tool & Engineering

Its the basic standard cable so the silicone lube would be okay although it should have arrived lubed. What kind of end fitting lube did you use? Just curious. Did you lube the both ends occasionally?

Is the lever on the motor case set at the spec angle as shown in the manual?

Sorry so many questions.

(edited to fix my murky question)
 

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I remember doing a search on the forum before choosing the clutch cable. I don't think I found the specific part number but I went with Barnett.

I talked to a customer service rep at Barnett. He asked about the lube as well. I clarified that I used a silicone-based lube - Cable Life, thinking that was the problem with the previous cable. He mentioned the clutch cable housing doesn't need to be lubed beforehand; maybe the end where it latches in the clutch lever but it's not necessary.

However, that's exactly where it snapped. It didn't snap on the motor case side. I sent him the same pics. He said he's never seen it frayed where it frayed on the cable. They are sending me a new one.

My concern is I'd like for this not to happen again. And I'm really confused if this was user error or lack of quality control on their part. 6 years ago, I installed a clutch cable before a road trip on my first Warrior. It's still on there, still works as advertised, even after sitting in a garage for 2 years.

Fingers crossed.....
 

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I remember doing a search on the forum before choosing the clutch cable. I don't think I found the specific part number but I went with Barnett.

I talked to a customer service rep at Barnett. He asked about the lube as well. I clarified that I used a silicone-based lube - Cable Life, thinking that was the problem with the previous cable. He mentioned the clutch cable housing doesn't need to be lubed beforehand; maybe the end where it latches in the clutch lever but it's not necessary.

However, that's exactly where it snapped. It didn't snap on the motor case side. I sent him the same pics. He said he's never seen it frayed where it frayed on the cable. They are sending me a new one.

My concern is I'd like for this not to happen again. And I'm really confused if this was user error or lack of quality control on their part. 6 years ago, I installed a clutch cable before a road trip on my first Warrior. It's still on there, still works as advertised, even after sitting in a garage for 2 years.

Fingers crossed.....
Did you check in the lever where the cable hooks in that there are no burrs or sharp edges that are contributing to the cable frey?
 

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You absolutely must lube both cable ends. I hit mine with a short shot of conventional WD40 every oil change and any time I give the cable some sort of attention.

Your cable part# is black coat and the inner cable is vinyl lined. It came with silicone inside it. But conventional WD40 has always worked on the cable ends.

I think most all the Barnett clutch cables are HE by default these days, and come silicone packed internally. I bet mine (PTFE/Stainless/HE) is ten years old but its still buttery even with SR2/Gold.

I'm hoping your trouble is due to alignment or end-connection-lube and not due to factory quality, but you've been around the block awhile and know how-to. It could be quality.

Anxious to learn what you observe and discover. Especially related to the e-manual's cable set-up procedure (and Bryan's video is imo a cool companion).

(edited with the Barnett part terms to match their catalog)

Adding info relating to Teflon / Nylon questions I'm getting.
Virgin PTFE contains no recycled PTFE.
Nylon66 is nylon with PTFE.
Both are easily googled.
Also examples from a quick search:

Way back when I bought my Barnett clutch cable it was described as having a Teflon coated inner cable and the outer clear over the stainless braid was PTFE (they are the same) which will remain clear despite sunlight and weather. The outer is still PTFE but more recently their description indicates the inner cable is nylon coated (which is similar but different). Both use silicone lube internally and accomplish the same internal HE goal.
 

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You are suppose to lube or put a shot of grease at the ends on the cables. Barnett, i think use to say to not lube the cables themselves, they come lubed. Just throwing this out there, but WD-40 cuts oil. I clean oil and grease off my hands with the stuff. I would not recommend using it where you want oil or grease to stay unless you are using it for something that just needs very little lubrication. But what do i know. 🤣
 
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WD40 is a mix of lubricant and water displacement and other stuff. They now make a motorcycle-specific product but I have not tried it.

I don't lubricate my PTFE Barnett cables, I only spray the pivoting cable ends. But over many years I used conventional WD40 to lubricate stock cables and ends and seldom snapped any. Trouble is I like stainless braid and especially like it to have the clear protective cover, and wet lubes really make them look like crap. Edited to be completely clear: while the black cover on this cable would not show discoloration from lubing the internal cable with WD40 or spray cable lube, this cable is internally lubed at factory with silicone and any other internal lube would create problems internally. I only use WD40 on the cable's end connections.
 

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WD40 is a mix of lubricant and water displacement and other stuff. They now make a motorcycle-specific product but I have not tried it.

I don't lubricate my PTFE Barnett cables, I only spray the pivoting cable ends. But over many years I used conventional WD40 to lubricate stock cables and ends and seldom snapped any. Trouble is I like stainless braid and especially like it to have the clear protective cover, and wet lubes really make them look like crap. But these cables are black so no issue with wet lube!
The Barnett sales rep said that WD40 is ok for the ends.
 

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Just my 2cents..

But maybe something wrong with ur clutch
That's causing premature clutch cable failure

Sent from my SM-A102U1 using Tapatalk
 

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The Barnett sales rep said that WD40 is ok for the ends.
The WD-40 might be ok but i don't take the word of a sales rep about anything. If a long time mechanic gave me that info i would value his opinion and take his word about the issue. Most sale rep's have never got their hands dirty working on anything. WD-40 is not going to hurt anything but may not be the best product for the job. Just my personal opinion mind you.;) I wish i had invented it though.
 
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Barnett cables come with a small packet of grease. You apply to the metal contacting areas.

Use a grease better then a runny fluid.
If there is something wrong in the perch/adjusting screw then lube won't really help. Maybe for a while but you'll still have it break.
 

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That's what I got with my Barnett's clutch cable..

And I used as much as I could...

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As of yesterday my front and back and side yards are completed. Fence and retaining wall and hidden gate. And the old koi pond is now a flagstone patio for more mingle room. Plus my friend is out of the hospital for awhile, so I have today free. Might get a ride in.

Anyway back to topic. I find that I will do things more often if they require less time. Busy. I think its good the top of the clutch cable end is booted, the grease there should stay clean longer. On the bottom it sometimes helps to loosen the lever spring to clean off the old grease and apply the new. Trapped grit is sandpaper.

Some industrial machinery also has both enclosed and open lube points, and in some there is a tendency for the acting part to clear a pathway in the grease pack. Between moving air, moisture, dust and dirt etc plus temperature changes it sometimes firms-up the lube just enough the pathway also firms up, or other times the lube is thinned and lost to drips or evap etc. I can't count the number of industrial levers and gear bearings etc I have seen that failed for lube due to a pathway having been cleared by the moving part, or captured environmental debris.

On motorcycles, I got tired a long time ago of disconnecting the cable ends to clean out the old lube and apply new.

Way back I followed what was proven advice. WD40 cleans-out the area and the cleaning agent evaporates rapidly while the lubricant does not evaporate, it dries into a film. That lubricant is what you feel on your hands for a moment right when the spray dries. Yes I use it for cleaning my hands too.

The original WD40 is sold around the planet. Except California now excludes it. So they reformulated for California and I have not used any of those new varieties yet.

When I got my Barnett clutch cable (which never needs internal re-lube) it became almost instant to service. I just hold a rag under the end connections. Short shot of WD40. Let it drip off and evaporate so lube film forms. Done.

I'm not arguing any point or selling anything. But in my experience over 30+ years in industry and owning motorcycles etc there are some spots where WD40 is in the long run as-or-more effective than the assembly lube packet for things like cable ends and lever pins and sockets, both enclosed and open.

Everybody uses what they use for some reason or another, right!

 

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I’m not sure if it is still used, but one of the things in WD40 is fish oil. Even though you couldn’t smell the oil it was there. The oils was what penetrated either the seized nut/bolt allowing it to do what it was meant to do. Also if you have fogged over headlight covers on your car WD40 can reduce the fogginess.
 

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Yep Stryder I knew growing up it seemed to attract fish. These days they say it does not have any fish oil and never did. No matter, I still like to think it used to. Dunno.

I bet the secret sauce will never be known at least in my lifetime, all I know is it works well and its so fast to zap the cable ends that I do it every oil change and even after washing the bike just because. Lube only works if its there making contact, right!
 
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