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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So right now im stuck.. i started to remove the bracket to be able to get to the AIS elbows to remove them. I had to unclip the drybreak in the AIS area to do so but as soon as i disconnect the drybreak fuel runs from the male part of the coupling and doesnt stop so forcing me to connect the drybreak again to stop the fuel from running out. In other words the fuel is escaping from the part of the drybreak that is bolted to the bracket, not from the coupling attached to the hose coming from the fuel tank. Why is this happening? Where is this fuel coming from? Is ot because i have a full tank of fuel and the underseat tank is maybe full or what? Please help as now im stuck and cant carry with what i wanted to do. Ps... i noticed the same thing happens to the rear dry break, as soon as i disconnect fuel runs from the male part and keeps on running. Again by male part i mean the part of the drybreak that receives the connecter that is attached to the hose coming from the fuel tank. In other words the fuel is not coming from the fuel tank directly but from somewhere else, maybe from the underseat tank ? I dont know... it has a silver part with a type of protruding silver nipple and the fuel is running out from there
 

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Post pictures.

Also look at the 'sprung a fuel leak' thread to see where troubles have occurred in the past.


The fuel flow: the top (main) tank feeds into the underseat (auxiliary) tank that has the fuel pump inside it. The auxiliary tank and the hoses are always full when there is any fuel in the top tank.

The stock dry breaks have twin valves to stop fuel flow from either half. You get a very small amount of fuel escaping. But no real flow.

You will need to ride the bike until the top tank is empty. Does your low-fuel light work? If yes, ride until the low fuel light illuminates. Then separate both dry breaks and no fuel will flow out.

Here's plenty of fuel system info to orient:


Also, in case helpful, if its been sitting in storage a long time:
1.

2.

Stock dry breaks (never use a 2002 dry break):
Fuel Tank - Dry Break '03 -'10 - Underseat:
Female 5PX-24305-00-00
Male 5PX-24304-11-00

Fuel Tank - Dry Break '03 -'10 - Left Side:
Female 5PX-24305-00-00
Male 5PX-24304-01-00


About Aftermarket Dry Breaks:
NOTE: with aftermarket dry breaks you must be certain they have valves in both halves. Also you must hold down the button when separating the halves AND when reconnecting the halves or the latch mechanism inside will nick the o-rings and create a fuel leak.

 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Arizona for the info and links...cannot find the cause in those links. Only a few days ago I still removed the fuel tank and then there was no flowing of fuel from the drybreaks after disconnecting them, just a few drops as is normal so this time when I disconnected first the rear drybreak fuel started running from the half of the drybreak not connected to the fuel tank so I quickly reconnected the drybreak to stop the fuel running out. I then disconnected the drybreak under the airscoop on the lefthand side and the same thing happened there. Isn't that too much of a coincidence that both drybreaks suddenly display the same problem? What the feck could it be? Mine is a 2006 model year by the way. Could it have something to do with me having disconnected the AIS? Maybe the vacuum line to the rear throttle body that I blocked off is causing it? Is that possible? By the way I have removed the metal AIS elbows and cut of the tubes flush with the plates and am having them welded shut.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
So the fuel keeps running from the second halves of the dry breaks even with the fuel tank completely removed. The part of the drybreaks connected to the fuel tank dont leak at all. The fuel comes from the other halves of the drybreaks that are connected to the bike. Why is this happening? There must be pressure still in the fuel system and reserve underseat tank to push out the fuel from the disconnected halves of the drybreaks. The fuel tank itself and the other halves of the dry breaks attached to the fuel tank are not leaking at all. What is causing this? It all started when I removed the AIS.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Pictures of your dry breaks please
Hi AW cant take pics now...It's nite time here and my bike is locked up in the garage and I am about to go to bed. But I can tell you there is nothing to be seen...photo's wont reveal anything as it all looks perfectly normal. The drybreaks look like they always have...it's not cracked or leaking at all when connected. When connected it's fine and no leaks and runs fine. It is only when disconnecting, then the bottom halve of the dry break which has a sort of silver needle type thingy in the middle which can be depressed by pushing on it with your finger and when you stop pushing it springs back up to it's normal position...now when I push that needle like thingy down then the fuel really starts gushing out and if I release the needle thingie then the fuel only kind of wells up and kinda seeps out slowly. Depressing needle it is in open position and when needle is not depressed it is in closed position. I think the needle thingie is depressed when the top half of the dry break is pushed onto the bottom half that contains the needle thingie and when it connects with that "click" feeling the fuel can then run freely through the dry breaks. That needle thingy that can be depressed is like a valve of some kind that lets the fuel flow when depressed and should stop the fuel flow when not depressed. It is obviously spring operated. When you disconnect the two halves of the dry break the needle thingy stops being depressed and jumps into undepressed mode and that should stop the fuel flowing then. But it is somehow I think not jumping fully into undepressed mode when disconnected and that is allowing some fuel to keep on flowing from it. And yes every time when I had to disconnect the drybreaks I always sprayed some WD40 inside both halves of the dry breaks before connecting them again. And they always give a nice click to indicate they are connected properly.
 

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It sounds like you are certain the dry breaks are the stock units and not aftermarket.

It sounds like there is solid-matter debris inside the dry break (probably both halves).

I am confused about fuel level. If the top tank is empty as in your Conversation-PM AND the low fuel light had illuminated then the fuel in the hoses and in the top space inside the auxiliary fuel tank will be empty to a point that fuel cannot run out an open hose.

This is why in the Conversation-PM I also had detailed briefly how the fuel lines work and that the top tank gravity feeds the bottom tank.

If you have compared the material and threads (also supplied prior) then you have enough info to realize if anything differs from stock. If all is stock then the dry break valve is debris clogged. The result in your case from what you have communicated is fuel will run out until the auxiliary tank fuel level drops a little. The fix is, as prior, to ride it until the low fuel light illuminates. Then carefully unbend the fuel line bent-clamps (with the matching tool you can unbend to remove then replace or possibly rebend same clamp to install)(that style of clamp is highly recommended because it's hard-fixed and nobody will unknowingly unscrew a clamp on the live gasoline line).

You have the links by Conversation-PM to how I flushed-out stock dry breaks. Slow work under a running faucet. Avoid nicking the o-rings. When observably clean, flush with lots of WD40 to displace all traces of water and lubricate. Reclamp the dry break onto hoses using same style bent-clamp. They are known by different brand names in different countries so the name used in the referred materials (Oetiker) may differ in your area.

You need to spray an occasional short shot of WD40 or known-similar material into the dry breaks. I do mine with oil changes and also spray the control cable ends same time.

No need for pictures since you seem certain all is stock. In which case this covers it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
AW thanks...yes my dry breaks are most definitely the 2006 model Warrior OEM original dry breaks. So how would solid matter debris have ended up in them? Contaminated fuel? Anyway so that then is the problem is it? And it is as simple to fix as rinsing them as you described. Phew...ok. But first I will have to run the bike until the fuel gauge comes on so almost empty. Can you maybe just describe in a bit more detail how I must remove the 2 drybreaks . What is the matching tool you mention and what do you mean by RECLAMATION onto hoses? Can I re-use the clamps that are on there now?
Then also while I was deleting the AIS I had to disconnect a smaller different type of dry break. It's the one just underneath the larger left side dry break. Is this smaller dry break actually also a dry break of some sort? Should I flush that one also in the same way? Are there still any other dry breaks or is that all of them?
 

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Crappy fuel. Bike parked for years. Who knows.

Added:
I have no idea about what you are thinking is a third (smaller) dry break and again a picture is needed to answer.

Added:
"Reclamp" apparently was spell-corrected to "reclamation" its now fixed. You can look at your clamps and determine what they are called in your country.

Use search criteria for what they are called here: "oetiker clamp and tool" then learn how to remove and how to clamp by using that as your second search criteria.

You can argue or use some other clamp its your bike but for those who follow this in future years imo there is value to having fuel hoses clamped in ways that are perfectly round and not easy to mess with and will not loosen from vibration and will not cut hoses. That is why factories use them.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Crappy fuel. Bike parked for years. Who knows.
Welll I don't know...been riding this bike a lot, had it for almost 2 years, never parked for more then a week at the most...never had an issue with the dry breaks before. Anyway...please...wont u answer my questions in the post just above? pretty please.

And per your request I took my other question from the private conversation and will place it here then.
Well i'm glad you are getting a good laugh out of this ;) OK I will r-use the stock gaskets...I would just have liked to know your motivation for recommending I do not and suggesting non-stock gaskets. It worries me not to know why so if you don't mind wont you please just give me a reason. Thanks AW...sorry i don't want to be a pain in the rear end.
 

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I learned this the hard way after working on my warrior first time dealing with this dry beak ....really it should be called a check valve ....when you disconnect it fuel may drip out or not at all but if it starts to pour out look at the brass needle in the middle of the black disconnect where the fuel coming out of and tap it with your finger ....it should make the valve work properly and stop fuel
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I learned this the hard way after working on my warrior first time dealing with this dry beak ....really it should be called a check valve ....when you disconnect it fuel may drip out or not at all but if it starts to pour out look at the brass needle in the middle of the black disconnect where the fuel coming out of and tap it with your finger ....it should make the valve work properly and stop fuel
I will tap it a few times tomorrow like you suggest and see if that helps. I did depress it with my finger and then the fuel really started gushing out so I quickly stopped doing that and then it slows to a smallish trickle but it spilled all over my underseat wiring and right down the innards of the bike to end up dripping on the floor. Quickly reconnected the dry break and it stopped leaking. I hope the fuel hasnt damaged any of the electrical wiring and such under the seat.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Found a post by another member on the forum who had the same problem...he was given advice also to tap the dry break....pity he never came back to report whether that solved his problem. Be sure to read the answer that Alanh gave...
 

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I will tap it a few times tomorrow like you suggest and see if that helps. I did depress it with my finger and then the fuel really started gushing out so I quickly stopped doing that and then it slows to a smallish trickle but it spilled all over my underseat wiring and right down the innards of the bike to end up dripping on the floor. Quickly reconnected the dry break and it stopped leaking. I hope the fuel hasnt damaged any of the electrical wiring and such under the seat.
So in my situation it happened on dry break line coming from the TOP of the fuel tank going to connection behind the cover to the side .not underneath the seat ...gasoline is not only used to help vehicles run but also as a cleaner so I would be shocked if it messed up anything under the seat .
 

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Discussion Starter #15
So in my situation it happened on dry break line coming from the TOP of the fuel tank going to connection behind the cover to the side .not underneath the seat ...gasoline is not only used to help vehicles run but also as a cleaner so I would be shocked if it messed up anything under the seat .
Sure you are right but I am more worried that gasoline will dissolve the adhesive on the electrical tape that is wound around some of the wiring so causing that tape to unwind and become loose eventually.
Ps. Did the tapping of the dry breaks solve your leak?
 

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So I started with the top line first when I seen it dump I tap meaning I tapped on the the brass needle sticking out a few times till it made the gasket or diaphragm or whatever's the setup is inside that black connection seat properly and yes it stop .I had like half a tank of gas in it still ...as for the back one the one under the seat it didn't leak on me .tho I was prepared to do the same thing I also had a gas can ready to catch if fuel decided to start pouring out of the connection....you will need a helper for that to hold the catch can ....that or find a siphon with a small diameter hose and just typing out all the fuel from tank ......
252072
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for the detailed explanation SW...much appreciated
 
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