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Hi, I couldnt think of a better place to came and ask this question. Im new to motorcycles. Getting my license and will hopefully be out and about looking for bikes soon. I have fallen in love with the warriors, however... Being that I am new to bikes in general, I am assuming that these are probably a little "too much" of a bike for me. There is an 05' warrior for sale (used of course) near me. Like I said I have just absolutely fallen in love with these bikes. Im not a big person (about 145lbs.) Im just curious to know since most if not all of you own these bikes, what is your opininon??? Im not a speed crazy person, just looking for a nice cruiser. Your input is greatly appreciated!!
 

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Not too much at all. They might vibrate a bit compared to learner bikes but once they're up and running they're great to ride and handle really well. Just watch doing your slow turns and keep off the front brake when doing do.
 

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Welcome JBone. Many people have had the Warrior as their first bike, it all depends on you really. Just make sure that you take a MC riders course first and then when you are ready don't buy new (buy used) as you are bound to drop the bike a couple of times - especially during slow manoevres. Best of luck.
 

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J, there will be many who disagree with me, Buy a used small bike,take a MSF course and learn how to ride using what you learned in the course. Then ride and practice some more. Take the expanded MSF course. Get the Warrior next year.
 

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It's all about control.Small bike or big bike either way its a 2 wheeler, and it's the cars and such that are most dangerous. The warrior may be big and powerfull but it is very nimble and easy to ride. I had been off a bike for 10 yrs and jumped on the warrior. It is a lot of bike but it is all about control. Take a good safety course and learn to contol your wrist. You will grow into the bike quickly.
 

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Take the course. Buy the Warrior. If you don't buy the bike you want you won't be happy riding the beginner bike. The Warrior is a big bike, just take it easy and grow into it.
 

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A lot of bikes these days are pretty big, pretty fast. Unless you buy an older nighthawk or shadow and are happy with it, buy the warrior and ease into the power especially around turns.
 

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I had the same problem but I hadn't ridden in over 15 years and then the bikes were small. I fell in love with the warrior at first site. that wide body and her curves just were meant for me. the owner of the dealer started her up for me and let me sit on her and throttle just for the feel. I felt 1700cc was a lot to handle, but that roar was unbelievable and I felt like I had controll of the power with the throttle[/emoticons/emotion-4.gif] the shakeing told me she was ready andwanted to break loose, purchased on the spot.[/emoticons/emotion-2.gif]. after ridding a few days I proposed and she said yes, now shes with me forever[/emoticons/emotion-2.gif][/emoticons/emotion-2.gif][/emoticons/emotion-2.gif]. you won't regret getting the warrior now.
 

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Consider a dirt bike for learning if you have someplace to ride one. Learning to handle a bike at the same time cagers are trying to kill you on the road is a lot to handle.

Also Keith Code's book "A Twist of the Wrist Vol I" is a great book on cycle control. It's a really cheap way to learn a lot.
 

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quote:Originally posted by gman

Take the course. Buy the Warrior. If you don't buy the bike you want you won't be happy riding the beginner bike. The Warrior is a big bike, just take it easy and grow into it.


+1
 

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another vote for the MSF course. it'll not only teach you how to ride, but more importantly, it'll teach you how to ride safely. an added benifit is insurance discount which will help a lot being that you are a new rider.

the warrior is a big bike but it will not too much for a new rider to handle.
 

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How about a used warrior?

The warrior was my second bike. I'm glad that I did my learning on something else. I never dropped or fell on my first bike, but it did suffer a few oopsies.
 

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+1 on the MSF course. I was away from riding for 20 years, then took the class and bought a beater 650 Vstar to "relearn" on. I was glad I did, but really up to you. It is a lot of bike to learn on.
 

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Be careful, part of respecting a bike is not just taking it easy when you get on it... it is knowing when not to get on it at all. This is a big bike, and as superbee said, trying to learn to ride while trying to stay out from under distracted cagers is a difficult task. I am not saying not to go for it. Just avoid traffic. stay out of traffic if at all possible. Empty parking lots to learn how to handle the bike at slow speeds (which for me was the hardest thing to get used to) it is when you feel her weight the most. Then moving up to country roads with minimal traffic. You should be fine, but it has to start with you knowing what your limits are before getting on the bike. Oh and one last thing, always keep in mind what the person who taught me to ride said… “I am in control of this machine. It does not do anything I don't allow it to. I take it where I want to go, the way I want to get there.
 

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I took the MSF course, and riding a 2002 Warrior after a 30 year lay off. Great bike, just don't try to be a speed racer, and you will do just fine.
Mike
 
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