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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,

I am 25 and am finally in a position to get my first bike. I'm going to take the MSF basic riders' course in the next couple of weeks so i'm definitely a beginner. How do you think a warrior would be for my first bike. I was thinnking of buying a used 2002 with some miles on it. I'm a really in-shape 5'10" 170lbs so I'm not a huge guy. I ride downhill mountain biking a lot so I really am used to balance and all that(not that thats the same as riding a 600 pound bike, by any means). Would this bike be too much for me? If you think it would be, do you have any suggestions for a beginner bike? I really like cruisers and hate sport bikes. Any help would be ummm... helpful.

My grandpa used to ride his old Indian around everywhere and I always wanted to ride with him. Unfortunately he past on before I had a chance, but I still have the itch to learn to ride.
 

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I don't think the RSW is a bad choice as "first-bikes" go. One thing is certain, when you buy a smaller bike and get used to it, the hunt is immediately on for the next bigger bike. Save the trouble and the money by getting the Warrior and then taking your time getting used to it's characteristics.
On taking the RSW to the course, maybe you should use their gear, instead. I remember when the wife and I took the MSF, the instructors were very particular about what bikes other than the ones they provided could be brought on to the track. My wife could not ride her Ninja 250 and was asked to use their Rebel.
This thread has come up before so maybe you can read some of the other great comments form folks who have previously posted?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ok, thanks. I will do a search. I wasn't going to get purchase the RSW until after the MSF course, but that is encouraging that I could just go straight to the RSW. Thank you.
 

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As Blubruce said. Do a search and you'll find more info. IMO going to straight to a Warrior is not something I would recommend. Some have done it and been successful, but it has a lot to do with the individual person. Some people have natural ability and others maybe just lucky. Either way your chances for survival are far better if you take the MSF class and start a little smaller until you get some experience. Mountain biking will have very little to aid you in street riding survival with a large cruiser like the Warrior.

I used to be a hang gliding instructor and I would a have a few pilots coming in saying how they already new how to fly. They quickly learned that it was a completely different thing. Like motorcycling, there were those that had natural ability and did very well. There were those who push it a little and got off lucky without serious damage to themselves or our equipment. There were others that tried to advance before they were ready and got seriously hurt. Actually I should say that "They thought they were ready for more", but I advised against it. They took it upon themselves to go out on their own and risk it. Some of them are paying for that mistake for the rest of their lives in a wheel chair.

Take the MSF class and then make your own decision. It's easy to find people who will support you on both sides of the argument. Educate yourself and make the best decision you can, and be sure you can live with the consequences.
 

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This topic always splits right about down the middle. Some saying its not a good idea and some saying you can do it if your careful blah blah blah. This was hammered pretty good just a couple of weeks ago. I would do search. I come down on the don't do it side. I advocate buying a beater bike and well, beating it. Buy the warrior after a year and 10,000 miles of riding. Riding a smaller bike makes you a better rider in the long run. Granted there are worse bikes to start on... at least this one won't wheelie right out from under you...
 

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I agree with ezas. I wouldn't do a Warrior for first bike. I would say an 800 Kawasaki Vulcan Classic for first bike for your size and ability. But do the search. I won't even let my buddy touch my bike and he just bought a Honda GoldWing. Too much torque for him I think. Get the beater bike and ride, ride, ride. After you put in your time, by all means get the warrior. You won't have to buy another bike.
 

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Scarman, whats scary it that this comes up all the time on the boards for the R1's, busa's etc. And it comes down pretty much the same way it does here, some saying start slow, and some saying "you can do it cuz I did." I have done a fair amount of risky things in my life, and I will never understand why people 'rush' to increase the risk of something already risky.

I stood by a lake and watched a bought that same day first bike BMW rider ride right off the road and into a tree. He was not hurt bad but that bike was a write-off. But 'our' new riders would never do anything like that. Would never grab too much front brake on wet leaves, gravel, etc and lay a 600+ pound bike down.

Riding a bike, any first bike is hella fun. But I don't think thats why most people buy bikes when they look at busa's/warriors/R1s as first bikes... some other reason I guess.

Where did you teach hangliding? I used to do some flying at Sylmar, and took my first lessons up at Dillon beach, got my hang II down in Georgia at Lookout Mountain, a couple of trips to the dunes at Seaside, and a few close calls that taught me a LOT about being careful (and no wind/tailing wind take-offs)
 

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Scoop, there are several things that can get you seriously hurt on a motorcycle. I know that most are obvious, but here's my answer to your question as it relates to that fact:

1.Other drivers
Risk mitigation:
--position yourself for maximum visibility, i.e. lane positioning, clothing, be big (smaller bike is a minus in this department).
--Get pipes so people hear you coming (some people will try to tell you that loud pipes are only an annoyance, but I speak from experience when I say that people WILL turn and look at you when they otherwise might not).
--slow for intersections, roll off the throttle and cover your brakes if you see a potentially dangerous situation ahead (i.e. a driver who is not looking at you....remember the loud pipes thing?). This is particulary true for oncoming cars turning left in front of you. I had a friend killed about 2 weeks ago in that exact situation.
--check your mirrors often, and don't install "show" mirrors that you can't see in. The last thing you want is to take a suburban enema at 50mph.

The warrior is a big bike that stands out in traffic, particularly with a good aftermarket exhaust setup.

2. Road hazards.
Risk mitigation:
--slow down on wet roads, especially in curves. City streets can be especially slick. The first time you pull up to a stop sign and put your feet down, then your foot slips and your bike falls over, you'll see what I mean.
--watch for grease/oil spots or sand/gravel in turns (I have experience on this one)
--metal surfaces with a touch of oil on them (like railroad tracks, or some of those big plates they like to put over construction holes) are nearly as slick as ice when they're wet, so try not to lean your bike over at all while going over them.
--try not to freak out and crash trying to avoid a pothole, just try to get a little of your weight onto your feet and keep the bike straight up. Obviously if it's a great big gaping hole, then you should try to avoid it....

The warrior is an extremely well balanced, sure-footed motorcycle. When I first got mine, I was taking it fairly easy on the throttle, but I didn't break the rear tire loose for the first two weeks (and it rained every day those two weeks).

3. Equipment
Risk mitigation:
--DO NOT ride on bad tires. If a tire is bald or damaged, just replace it. I usually go through rear tire about every 5,000 miles, fronts usually last a little longer.
--If something comes loose, get it tightened.
--Wear a helmet, long pants, and boots at minimum. Wear a jacket if you can.


3. Yourself
Risk mitigation:
--know your bike. Obviously you have to start somewhere, but learn your bike before you start trying to test your/its limits. I also have experience on this one--been riding a lot since about '96, but I went down on my wife's bike a few months ago....just tried to push a bike I didn't know around a corner too hard.
--Don't try to make a sport bike your first bike. Obviously smaller is easier to start with, but balance is just as important. Many "beginner" bikes are not balanced for crap (my wife's, for example is way too top heavy).

You sound like a pretty reasonable person, so I don't think the warrior is too big of a stretch for a first bike for you. Understand it is significantly faster than something like a honda shadow or similar, but it's nothing like trying to start out with sport bike that will do 170mph and go 0-60 in 3 seconds. You will not loop it over with an accidental twist of the wrist.

Another thing to consider: you will most likely lay down your first bike (unless you just don't ride it very long before moving to a different bike). I'm not trying to be grim, but I know very few people who ride and haven't laid one down. Whether in the driveway, at a stop sign, or in a turn, it just happens.
 

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Hey Ezas,
Back in the 80's I helped out at Mission Soaring Center in Milpitas and then did some stuff on my own here in the valley. Once people got their hang 1 from Mission, I took them to various places around here to work with them on their hang 2. Once they got their hang 2, then they could fly Dunlop up near the Sequoias. That and Tollhouse are really great places to fly around here, but I'd say you need to be a solid hang 2 and fly with someone who has experience with both sites. Both sites are jumping off a 2500 foot shear drop and the landing zones are a bit tight. Really great thermals.

I know what you mean about no wind take offs. Run like **** and jump like your life depended on it. Once my wife got pregnant in 94 the hang glider had to go. I didn't think that life insurance waiver was a responsible action for my new family. I enjoy riding as much as I did flying.
 

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Yep, I'm a newbie. This is my first post to this site. I had to chime in because I'm in a similar situation. New rider (only 5,000 miles under the belt).

I was the typical late-comer, always wanted a bike but never did anything about it. A relative of mine introduced me to the Warrior. I fell in love immediately. No other bike grabs me like the Warrior.

I took the MSF late last August. Aced the written and missed one point on the practical. By September, I purchased a Nina 500R. Light, agile, and forgiving. 51hp/31tq. Here I am 5k+ miles later.

I've been considered (researching) moving to a 600cc sport/touring bike (not a 100hp crotch-rocket). I love the flickable characteristics of s sport bike and the seating position of a touring bike. I've made a list of about 6 bikes I'm considering. Yamaha, Suzuki, Kawasaki, and Ducati. All are 70-90 hp and 40-45 tq. My initial thought is, "Getting experience on a bike with more power than my little Ninja would help my adjust more quickly to the Warrior.". Then I remember what my MSF instructor said when I asked for her advise on purchasing a motorcycle in the context of "power". Her advise? Simply, "Who controls the throttle?". That sentence rings in my ears every time I mount the bike or start looking at others. I then think about keeping the 500R just because its a **** fun, well engineered motorcycle and getting the Warrior anyway.

Either way, I see having two motorcycles in my stable. A unnamed middle-weight sport/touring bike, and a MIDNIGHT WARRIOR.

Hope this helps.
 

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No one can really answer that other than you Scoop. I have been riding, legally, since 1966. I have mixed emotions on this. The Warrior was the first bike my, then, 18 year old son ever rode. It was in a school parking lot and he did amazingly well. He's a very gifted athlete which helped I'm sure. However, I would never have turned him loose on the street with it because he was only 17 and still immortal!! I feel maturity comes into play there. Two years later I tried the same thing with one of my nephews. He was in his mid 30s. not quite as athletic, but not bad, but definately NOT immortal and he knew that. To be honest, the Warrior intimidated him. I wouldn't turn him loose on the street cuz he just wouldn't have been ready and he didn't want to hit the street. He did have the maturity thing going for him. He realized his limitations and didn't try to push it. He knew he would need to start with something smaller. he now has a Ninja 500r with 5000 miles on it. He wants to do another 5000 before he gets his Warrior. Smart way to do it I think! My recommendation is to find someone who owns one and have him/her take you to a parking lot for a short introduction. It won't take long for you to determine whether or not it's the right first bike for you.
Welcome to the 4M Scoop. I guess I should also welcome my nephew, 2k1bullitt! Are you going to use a Warrior handle on the Mustang 4Ms?
 

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Well this is a very complex question but I come down firmly on the, This is not a bad first bike side. It's low, long, has good brakes, nice linear throttle response and for the size of it feels quite light. I think the "buy a smaller bike" argument is very over simplified. What kind of smaller bike? A 600RR? There's lots of dangerous small bikes out there. A very good point was made earlier with the "who's in control of the throttle". It has a lot more to do with the operator than the hardware in most cases.
Anyway the decision is yours and you've probably already made it. Ride smart and have a great time whatever you bring home.
 

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To each his own Scoop. You know yourself better than anyone. My advice is to take the course (that never hurts), maybe find someone that will let you ride their warrior so you can get at least a taste of the beast, and make ur decision from there, you'll know. The Warrior is a beast and she can be wickedly fun to ride when you spank her. But she can also beotch slap you if your not paying attention. Above all, ride with respect to the bike and your capabilities and you should be okay...well at least as much as you can be out there. Good luck and hopefully.....welcome to the family.
 

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I think all these comments are awesome (another reason I love this site), and I can't add anything more other than what I did: Late 20's decided "I should ride a motorcycle". Never thought much about it before that. Took MSF course, passed. Did a LOT of research, and ended up getting a used VStar 650. Man, that bike felt HUGE when I first got on it.... but after about 6 months had shrunk considerably. I had looked at the warrior, but it seemed waaaaay out of my league. Anyway, rode that VStar for 2.5 years before I found a good deal on a warrior, and picked one up. By then, I had over 25k miles under my belt, and was very comfortable on the bike. Have never had a single problem on the bike. The transition to the warrior was natural, comfortable, and fun. Like everyone else, you need to know yourself. I knew there was no way I could get a warrior off the bat, I just woulnd't be safe on it. And what's the point of getting a warrior as your first bike if you're just going to wreck it? (not trying to be negative) My opinion is, it's worth it to yourself to "work your way up". I mean, you got your WHOLE LIFE to enjoying biking, you wouldn't want to wreck that early, right? I lot of enjoyment I get from biking is riding different bikes, so take the time to do that. Besides, think about what new cool stuff Yamaha might have on the warrior in a few years? /emoticons/emotion-5.gif
 
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