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Hey all, please help me out if you can.

I'm a new rider alltogether...I used to ride a JR50 as a kid, but that's been a long time.

I really *LOVE* the looks of the warrior, and fortunately, if I choose it, I can get it.

I'm 26, and am 6' tall 220 lbs.

Do you all feel like, even though I'm new to cycles that I could handle this bike? I know it's a 1700cc (or there about), and super powerful, but could I handle it if I don't give it crazy amounts of throttle?

Other bikes just don't look as nice.

-Shane
 

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There are members here that have NEVER ridden a motorcycle before and started with a Warrrior, so it can be done. Personally, I would recommend something smaller and more damanagable to start with.
 

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I always tell first time street bike buyers... buy a piece of crap, take it out to an empty parking lot, and just drop it already and get it over with (you *will* drop your first bike within the first 90 days). Then get used to street riding for a few months, get a few more drops out of the way, and only then go and buy your dream bike.
 

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Agreed, the torque on this monster is nutz! To say you'll go "easy" on the throttle is a lie. The first time you're at a stop light you'll love roasting who ever is next to you. It can be done, but I'd suggest a riders course (you could get your license that way). I've ridden with guys that bought their warrior as a "first bike". Let's just say that you can "tell" that it's thier first bike. I started with a 250cc, then a 500cc, then a new 600cc, then the warrior. I think you should follow suit. Even if you only owned each bike for a month and moved on. You'd have a warrior in 4 months with a lot of lessons learned. Good Luck!
 

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Get a bike out of the paper for $500, ride it for a month or two at least. The warrior is pretty powerful - especially if your not used to riding - but also you need to get "used" to having a motorcycle. My first real bike (one I rode on the street anyway) was an old clunker I nabbed out of the paper. I dropped it TWICE! Once by opening the garage door opener and leaving it parked too close. Another time just not thinking about putting the kick stand down. There is just a few things you need to get used to. Things that become everyday once you've ridden a while and you won't think twice about. You would feel SICK if you forgot to put the kick stand own on your brand new warrior a week after you got it.

Get a beater, ride it till spring and join us. That's my advice.

Good luck on you purchase!
 

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quote:Originally posted by Yager

You would feel SICK if you forgot to put the kick stand own on your brand new warrior a week after you got it.




Just ask amospro! Lol sorry Jody, it's not funny.....but if one warrior can be saved by telling the story, then I think it's worth it! Merry Christmas all!
 

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what they said. get something used ride it, learn, then when you do have a warrior, you have a back up bike for when you are doing serious mods.
 

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Yo could by it and take it real easy for the first few weeks. Ten years ago I bought a honda shadow 600. Was great the first two weeks. After that, I wanted and needed more power. The bike was way too small for me. I say get what you want so you are happy. Ask a buddy who has a dirtbike to borrow it and ride it to get used to riding something again.

I did drop mine the first day I owned it. But thats because I forgot to put the kickstand down. [/emoticons/emotion-2.gif]
 

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Just my 0.02 cents. I'd get the Warrior if that's what you want. You have to know yourself and realize you need to get used to it, but in my experience that comes pretty quickly. After about 2 weeks or so of riding you will be glad you didn't get something smaller because you'd already be ready to get rid of it. Everyone goes through the same process when they move up from a bike to another. I remember back in 1981 I had never rode anything larger than a 500cc and was debating on the Seca 550 or the bigger badder Seca 750. I really wanted the 750. I got the 750 and knew it was more bike than I was used to in power and weight. Within 2 weeks I went from babying it around to wheelies, burnouts, etc... and was damned glad I bought the 750 because it seemed like a mini-bike to me after 2 weeks time. The Seca 750's dry weight was 11 lbs lighter than a Warrior is. I hadn't had a bike in 15 years when I bought my R1 in 1999. I knew I'd have to get used to it, it had been a while, but I would not of been happy not getting the bike I wanted. Turns out that I liked the looks and the seeming never ending power, but hated the comfort. So, I went from 15 years of not riding to an R1 then, a Warrior. I love the Warrior and can not, not recommend it. I personally feel with the low end torque it is a much easier bike to get a handle on then the peaky rockets. Just go in to it knowing, MODERATION. You will be comfortable before you know it. A safe riding course is always a good idea, no matter how much experience you have.
 

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Or, you could start out with one of those new Triumphs (Rocket III). It's so fugly that you could safely drop it and I don't think anyone would notice. It might make it look better.

Shane, looks like there is only one person that can answer your original question, and that's you. All have given good advice and most seem to be leaning toward starting with something else for the first one. Like you said, "Other bikes just don't look as nice", make sure you can keep it looking like that.
 

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The Guys pretty much said it. #1 safe rider course is a MUST! #2 you are very very likely to drop your first bike. About the only thing I'd add is I think the Warrior is a very easy bike to ride. Now I've been riding a long time so maybe I'm not the right guy to ask, but it's a big, long, low and torquey ride.
 

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sf,

If you search through the forums for responses on how many 1st time motorcyclists bought RSW's first, with no problems, you'll find a quite a few. There's a guy I've ridden with in NorCal that bought the RSW as his first bike, and rides it really well.
 

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sf, like the other guys said, there is a real good chance you'll drop your first bike. After about 6 months with my first one, I had dropped it once at a stop light, once in the driveway, and once in the mud (don't try riding through mud on your streetbike...), then I had a about a 20mph low-side from a greasy spot in a turn. I was beginning to know my bike and got a little cocky, was taking the turn a little aggressively, saw the oily spot but didn't evade because I didn't think it would be that slick....it was.

Personally, I think you'll probably be ok after taking the rider's safety course. You'll learn things in there that took me about 2 years of every day riding to learn on my own. The warrior is a relatively light cruiser and the way it handles at speed makes it feel smaller & lighter than it is. For a guy who's 6' 220, I would not recommend anything smaller than 1100 in the cruiser world, unless you get a smoking deal and plan to sell it after a couple of months.
 

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I guess the real question is "how comfortable do you feel about it"? The MSF (motorcycle foundation course) is an excellent idea. Do that before buying any bike (even if there's a two month wait to take the course).
Your size takes away alot of concerns about handling the bike. So, take the course and, if you feel reasonably comfortable, go buy the bike. If you drop it, you can usually replace the part without any major damage.
Completely separate from the possibility/probability of your dropping the bike is the issue of other drivers on the road while you're learning the bike. Drive as if the car people not only don't see you (even though they're looking right at you and waved hello), but as if they're actively out to get you.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Without a doubt, no questions, I will be taking the MSF course. That's a fact. I have heard nothing but great feedback on the MSF.

As far as the warrior goes, I'm still undecided, about every 4 hours I teeter from a used honda magna to the warrior. I still don't get why people drop their bikes, is it just being overwhelmed by the weight, or being careless with the kickstand. (please don't flame me, I'm not being a dick, i seriously don't know)

How is the warrior for passangers (obviously, sometime from now, when I really am comfortable riding by myself first)?

I'm still leaning towards the warrior.
 

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I've seen a few newbies starting out on these bikes.....they are pretty rider friendly but I think it all depends on the person.I've seen certain people that shouldnt be allowed near anything motorized and others that have some abilities right off the start so it all depends on where you are in that spectrum.The warrior is a strong cruiser but the bike isnt riding you...you are supposed to be riding it so there should be no problems?
 

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sfhickey, I haven't ridden a magna, but from what I understand, it's not exactly a slow bike either. It makes about as much horsepower stock vs. stock. Of course, torque is a different story entirely, but if you're thinking the warrior would be too fast for you, that probably won't be the case. As for people dropping their bikes, well that just happens. For example, one time when I still had my superhawk, I was backing into a parking place, I looked over my should & took my hands of the grips & pushed backwars. When I pushed, I was leaned to one side just enough to make the wheel turn & the bike started going down. Luckily that was a light bike and I was able to catch it & keep it from going all the way down (barely).

Little stupid stuff, but it happens. Since you're not that small of a guy, you should be able to handle most of the stupid stuff without dropping it to the ground, but there's always the "lay down". Most riders you'll meet will tell you there are two kinds of riders: those who have laid their bike down, and those who are about to. There's all kinds of situations that can come up if you ride in traffic that can make you lay it down, but even when there's no traffic, you never know when there will be a surprise in a corner.

I bought my wife a $900 honda nighthawk 450 off ebay and she dropped once on each of her first two rides (it was just a little too tall for her and is a pretty heavy first bike for a 120 lb woman). The plan is to get her onto a magna, or possibly a vtx1300 after she gets the hang of it.

Anyway, your situation is a little different than hers, but I don't think you'd be going wrong either way, just understand you'll probably feel the magna's pretty small.
 

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Ok, now I have another example of something stupid that can make your bike fall over (this happened to me yesterday). I had just started the bike, was still in neutral and went to put the kickstand up. On the way to reach the kickstand, my foot hit the shifter and dropped it into first. Boy am I glad the sidestand kill switch is there, but it still gave a good jump before it died.
 
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