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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Rear Suspension Spring Replacement


WHAT?
This topic is about the replacement of the rear suspension spring without removing the rear wheel.
It will be a easier and probably not much longer to remove the wheel, but it can be done.

The spring I bought is from Baron, see all the spec below.


WHY?
I tought of sharing my experience with other newbies and DIY beginners.
So I made this little HowTo.


AND?
You will find parts numbers, tools list, pictures and notes.
And to round it up a review of the product.


BACKGROUND
I went to an Automotive Repair school for two years and had been a certified car mechanic for several years.


DISCLOSURE
This mini project is very easy and basic for a technician (mechanic) and will not be too daunting for the novice handyman. BUT they are some steps that are dangerous, like do not underestimate the easy part like lifting the bike. And of course the obvious like to compressing the spring which require some force (between ½ and ¾ US-TON as shown on my gauge).


PARTS LIST

  • SHOCK SPRING Part Number: Baron BA-8523RD
  • Lithium-soap-based grease
  • Locktite (optional) Part Number: 242 Blue

TOOLS

  • jack (to lift the rear end, do not put it under the spring to block yourself or on the swingarm)
  • torque wrench
  • Key 17 mm
  • Box 10 mm
  • Steel pick
  • spring compression tool
  • Yamaha rear spring adjusting wrench

TECHNICAL SPECS

BARON spring :

  • Rating 935 lb
  • Free Length 7 1/2 '' (192.5 mm)
  • External diameter 3 1/2'' (88.90 mm)
  • Internal diameter 2 3/8'' (60.325 mm)
  • My measurements :
    • Free Length 192.0875 mm
    • External diameter 87.49 mm
    • Internal diameter 60.37 mm
    • Wire size 13.815 mm
From the manufacturer website :

  • Made to Baron's specifications by Eibach Springs, our spring allows your bike’s shock to do its job more effectively.
  • Improves damping control while eliminating bounce.
  • The 930-lb rating was determined to be the best possible to suit most riders’ needs vs the stock rating of 725-lbs.
  • With or without lowering kits, this spring offers a vast improvement to your motorcycle, especially when carrying passengers or heavier riders.

YAMAHA spring :

  • Rating 725 lb
  • My measurements :
    • Free Length 190.50 mm
    • Internal diameter 57.82 mm
    • External diameter 83.40 mm
    • Wire size 12.645 mm

HOW?
My steps are short but I have included the official procedures and some diagrams below.
But please do yourself a favor and get a copy of the « Yamaha Warrior Service Manual ».

  1. jack the bike safely
  2. remove the side horn
  3. Bolt (shock absorber-connecting arm-frame) (step #10 in Diagram1)
  4. remove some tension on the spring by backing the adjusting nut
  5. Bolt (step #1 in Diagram2)
  6. Bolt (step #2 in Diagram2)
  7. Bolt (step #7 in Diagram2)
******************
* ADDITIONAL NOTES *
******************

From Senior Member : iowawarrior
Since you asked about alternative info, you might know the 2002 shock differs, and the 2003-and-newer Warriors (like yours and mine) the rear shock has two adjustment rings.

For 2003+ you can remove the stock spring without compressing it. Just back-off the nut to the last thread and then turn it and it comes loose without hardly any remaining force. Then slide the bits out of the way to get at the circlip.

Being marginally shorter than stock, the Eibach 1000 pound spring can be installed onto the shock without a spring compressor on 2003+ shocks, but its a pita.

On 2002 shocks imo its smarter to use a spring compressor for removal and installation. Some have removed without one but I believe its too risky on that style shock.

In all cases using a spring compressor is nice tho.

One last thing, its important to install the adjustable links set to match stock length, otherwise the range of adjustment is limited. Some guys pre-adjusted the links to the amount of lowering they wanted, but then found they could not later raise the bike back to stock for carrying a passenger (for example). They had to un-install and start over.

Its also important to start with the rods threaded all-the-way-into the heims rod ends then backed-out one turn for a gap. These rods work in tension so they like all the thread bike they can get.
...
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Adjustments.

You need to set the spring compression (preload) and the rebound.
I put around ~55 mm of preload and 3 clicks for the rebound.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
*************************************
*** The excerpts from the manual are below. ***
*************************************


REVIEW

It does sit a bit higher with no one on the bike.

The ride is perfect for me/us.

Yes, alone or with the wife, the saddlebags and the gear, it is perfect.
It is smooth with good handling, before it was hitting hard on some potholes.

I punched mark a spot to see better where to measure the preload when I am crawling under the rig.

Enough monkey wrenching, NOW is the time to ride! ;)


*************************************
*** The excerpts from the manual are below. ***
*************************************
 

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good write up its easy if you have the tools in the garage

I changed mine a few years ago and added lowering links as I have short legs.

I do remember it was a PITA to put back in although it fell out easy

Dave
 

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pretty close to the same way I do it. I only take 3 bolts out (2 on the shock and 1 on the dog bones) then raise the rear tire all the way up into the fender and the shock assy pretty much falls out. ive gotten this down to a 30min or less job to swap the spring out now. only tools i ended up using were some basic wrenches/sockets and the yamaha coil over adjuster.

Very good write up! makes this a lot easier!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks guys.

Our friend arizonawarrior "pm" me additional info that I was not aware of (adjustable links, 2002 is different).

So I will add his info to this thread, I'll edit the first posting so to keep all information together... I do not like searching informations spread across 10 pages.

Also I have to change some diagrams and specs as I just found a newer version of the Yamaha manuals...and the specs differs.

Again, I want this to be accurate and complete as possible so do not hesitate to tell me if you see anything wrong.

Together we will prevail!;)
 

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Great write up.

Just fitted my eibach baron spring. 2006 model. still needed to compress the spring a bit to refit clip.
Excellent write up:Thumbsup:
 

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The Ebachi Spring is actually a lil shorter the the stock one..
The clip goes back on with out compressing the Ebachi Spring

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-J327A using Tapatalk
 

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You can also start by tightening up the spring some to make it stiffer first.
I did this and it worked out great for me solo riding at 210lbs with gear and set my rear sag at half inch. Havent done two up yet so I'm hoping it works ok for that and I dont need an eibach.

I say try it first!

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

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I did this and it worked out great for me solo riding at 210lbs with gear and set my rear sag at half inch. Havent done two up yet so I'm hoping it works ok for that and I dont need an eibach.

I say try it first!

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
With the stock spring and lowered to one inch above the rear tire, I could ride solo (200#) and no luggage but worried about big bumps and potholes. When I packed for long toad trips the rear got more active. When I had a light passenger the rear was too close so I adjusted the rear up again.

I went to Eibach 1000 and dropped back to an inch and have no problems so far!
 
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