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Discussion Starter #1
Just curious if anyone has installed rigid brake lines on their Warrior.

I'm specifically thinking of doing something like my sketch where there's a rigid line that runs from the top tree to the bottom of the fork tube, then having a flexible line come off the back to attach to the caliper. There would be a similar, shorter tube on the left side that would run from the bottom tree down after the tee take off from the right side by the bottom tree.

I just hate how the brake lines dangle and run all over the place.

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Not sure rigid lines would be a good idea in which the bike flexes and moves as well as the bars. They would be available to road debris to crimp or dent them. In cars they are tucked up right against the undercarriage so pretty safe usually.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Not sure rigid lines would be a good idea in which the bike flexes and moves as well as the bars. They would be available to road debris to crimp or dent them. In cars they are tucked up right against the undercarriage so pretty safe usually.
The rigid lines would be tucked behind the forks and only extend along the back of the forks. From the handle bar to the top of the line would still be flexible and from the bottom of the line to the caliper would still be flexible. Only from the top of the trees to the bottom of the fork tubes would be rigid. I'd be using billet clamps similar to what's below to attach the lines at the top and bottom to keep them still and in position to maintain clearance during turning and suspension activity.

This would clean up the brake lines from going out in front of the forks up top and flexing all over down below the trees and localizing it to be only by the calipers. Between this and some internal wiring, the bars and front end overall would be significantly cleaned up.

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So you would run 1 line (flexible) down to a hard line and then how would you do the split to both calipers and still keep it clean? Because stock is one line down and then it Y to go to both calipers one on each side of the rim.
 

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Some many moons back in the 80’s there was a fad in Victoria where guys would replace most of their front brake lines with metal tubing as they said it gave cleaner lines. At the time I seem to remember thinking “why”. However it didn’t take that long ( maybe 2 years ) when accidents started to happen because the front brakes gave out. I remember an old guy who owned a bike shop in Melbourne ( he dealt with Triumphs, BSA’s AJS’s etc ) saying that the rubber brake hoses created a shock absorbency and it made predominantly metal the shock absorbablety would be gone. Vibration of metal causes it to lose its strength. He also said that the tubing being hit by debris can also cause weakness as well as dints which could cause leakage. People forget what pressures are involved when applying the front brake.
Now this coming from a guy who worked on motorbikes that on average we 40 yr old back then and none of those bikes had disc brakes.
It’s totally up to the individual as to what they want to do on their bikes, but in a case like this seems simple enough, but give it some deep thought and ask questions. The life you could be saving is yours.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
So you would run 1 line (flexible) down to a hard line and then how would you do the split to both calipers and still keep it clean? Because stock is one line down and then it Y to go to both calipers one on each side of the rim.
The y would be a tee fitting just below the lower triple and a line would run under the neck to the left side, then turn down to the left caliper. Both sides would be tucked behind the fork tubes to prevent any debris from being able to make a direct hit.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Some many moons back in the 80’s there was a fad in Victoria where guys would replace most of their front brake lines with metal tubing as they said it gave cleaner lines. At the time I seem to remember thinking “why”. However it didn’t take that long ( maybe 2 years ) when accidents started to happen because the front brakes gave out. I remember an old guy who owned a bike shop in Melbourne ( he dealt with Triumphs, BSA’s AJS’s etc ) saying that the rubber brake hoses created a shock absorbency and it made predominantly metal the shock absorbablety would be gone. Vibration of metal causes it to lose its strength. He also said that the tubing being hit by debris can also cause weakness as well as dints which could cause leakage. People forget what pressures are involved when applying the front brake.
Now this coming from a guy who worked on motorbikes that on average we 40 yr old back then and none of those bikes had disc brakes.
It’s totally up to the individual as to what they want to do on their bikes, but in a case like this seems simple enough, but give it some deep thought and ask questions. The life you could be saving is yours.
VERY good info and a big part of why I’m asking the question. The clean lines (aesthetically speaking) is what got me thinking about doing something like this.

I’m curious about this statement. “Vibration of metal causes it to lose its strength.” Metal brake lines aren’t new and it’s not like our bikes see the high frequency vibrations of a sport bike engine. In my experience (specifically working on military helicopters) the only time we had hydraulic line failure was because or rubbing. As long as the line can’t vibrate against something, there isn’t any issue. The billet clamps mentioned above would more than insure the lines couldn’t move and rub. But it’s a good point for people not used to working with high pressure fluid lines.
 

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VERY good info and a big part of why I’m asking the question. The clean lines (aesthetically speaking) is what got me thinking about doing something like this.

I’m curious about this statement. “Vibration of metal causes it to lose its strength.” Metal brake lines aren’t new and it’s not like our bikes see the high frequency vibrations of a sport bike engine. In my experience (specifically working on military helicopters) the only time we had hydraulic line failure was because or rubbing. As long as the line can’t vibrate against something, there isn’t any issue. The billet clamps mentioned above would more than insure the lines couldn’t move and rub. But it’s a good point for people not used to working with high pressure fluid lines.
Mate I’m no metallurgist, just the messenger. However in my pointed little mine metal does react to vibrations overtime. Whether the metal be steel or aluminium vibration does change the molecular structure. However I’d have to dig my Grandfather up to re explain it to me ( He was a structural engineer ) and that takes on a whole new realm lol. However let’s go to something I have experienced myself. When I owned a HD Sporty I noticed by accident that the metal sections of the front brake line ( that was metal ) that there had become some swelling in that line. Now HD used to coat the metal bits not with black powder coating, but like a tight plastic ( the same as you get on some steel coat hangers ). Now over time that plastic would react with UV as well as the weather and fine cracks would appear. Now even though these cracks couldn’t be seen when they first appeared they were still large enough for moisture to enter thus causing rust or oxidisation to happen. In HD’s case it was rust. Now because these parts were away from everyday eyesight you never noticed what was happening until you hit your front brake and nothing would happen. Now this has not only happened to me, but others I have talked to over the years. Just because I didn’t ride for 35 yrs didn’t meant I didn’t have an interest in them. Luckily with the metric bikes these days they use aluminium which breaks down differently to steel. It is only an opinion, but an opinion that I have lol. With regards to military equipment, being an ex serviceman myself I know that we regard our equipment differently to the outside world. However, you mentioning Hueys ( nickname not brand name ) the rotors of copters are an aluminium composite with a honeycomb interior ( unless they are made of plastic now lol ). They only have a certain service life because of a few things ( not mentioning bird strikes ) the vibration of the metal due to high revolutions ( vibration ) the metal actually weakens after a time. Anyway Random it’s 5am Sunday morning here and this is too in-depth even for my brain lol. Darn I need a woman in my life lol.
On a side note I’m having an argument with a guy over the shelf life of rubber as in bike tyres. It’s not dissimilar to what we have been talking about. He had bought a 1977 triumph and it only has 16k in the clock, but it brakes like your on an ice rink. That in itself is a whole different story. As I have stated this is just my opinion based on information gather over nearly 50 years of asking questions and experience I have gained.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Mate I’m no metallurgist, just the messenger. However in my pointed little mine metal does react to vibrations overtime. Whether the metal be steel or aluminium vibration does change the molecular structure. However I’d have to dig my Grandfather up to re explain it to me ( He was a structural engineer ) and that takes on a whole new realm lol. However let’s go to something I have experienced myself. When I owned a HD Sporty I noticed by accident that the metal sections of the front brake line ( that was metal ) that there had become some swelling in that line. Now HD used to coat the metal bits not with black powder coating, but like a tight plastic ( the same as you get on some steel coat hangers ). Now over time that plastic would react with UV as well as the weather and fine cracks would appear. Now even though these cracks couldn’t be seen when they first appeared they were still large enough for moisture to enter thus causing rust or oxidisation to happen. In HD’s case it was rust. Now because these parts were away from everyday eyesight you never noticed what was happening until you hit your front brake and nothing would happen. Now this has not only happened to me, but others I have talked to over the years. Just because I didn’t ride for 35 yrs didn’t meant I didn’t have an interest in them. Luckily with the metric bikes these days they use aluminium which breaks down differently to steel. It is only an opinion, but an opinion that I have lol. With regards to military equipment, being an ex serviceman myself I know that we regard our equipment differently to the outside world. However, you mentioning Hueys ( nickname not brand name ) the rotors of copters are an aluminium composite with a honeycomb interior ( unless they are made of plastic now lol ). They only have a certain service life because of a few things ( not mentioning bird strikes ) the vibration of the metal due to high revolutions ( vibration ) the metal actually weakens after a time. Anyway Random it’s 5am Sunday morning here and this is too in-depth even for my brain lol. Darn I need a woman in my life lol.
On a side note I’m having an argument with a guy over the shelf life of rubber as in bike tyres. It’s not dissimilar to what we have been talking about. He had bought a 1977 triumph and it only has 16k in the clock, but it brakes like your on an ice rink. That in itself is a whole different story. As I have stated this is just my opinion based on information gather over nearly 50 years of asking questions and experience I have gained.
All very good points. I definitely wouldn't be looking to do any plastic coated brake lines. At most, I'd take the steel lines and paint them the same color as my pipe (Cerakote Glacier Black). I see what you're saying, though. Thank you for sharing your wealth of information!

IF I do move forward with doing this mod, I'll be posting tons of pics and such and I always welcome feedback, especially when it's a safety concern.
 
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