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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so I’m trying to take off the pipe and me kneels down to checkout the forward control and see how about taking it off and apparently the previous owner did a number on one the bolts. Luckily in my 40 years on this earth I haven’t encountered a stripped hex like this. Anyone have any good tips or tricks to get her out?
Tire Automotive tire Wheel Automotive lighting Tread
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ahhh, there is no room to get a wrench on it plus it’s button cap type so the is really nothing to grab onto. I’ll get an extractor set and pray to the warrior gods for a swift and painless extraction hopefully. I’ll keep y’all updated
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I like that idea since i already have a dremel. The other 3 bolts look ok. I’m guessing they are torqued down pretty hard and loctited. I already got the Yam stock bolts but may go ahead use a standard 12/14mm bolt with the correct thread.
 

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That's a M10 x 1.25p DIN Fine thread ... very tough to find in button head and also a common occurrence with stripping for this fastener.
If you have the stock foot controls one solution that will work, just fine, is drilling the slim head off the button head fastener and then using a vise grip to back it out after removing the stock bracket. A Dremel tool will do the deed also.
You'll want to take care not to damage the bracket while doing the deed. ;)
When working on these fasteners that go into the frame you'll want to clean them out carefully with compressed air and reassemble with never-seize or equivalent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Awesome alan thank you. I’m gonna try and be patient, I’ll try the dremmel flat hat trick if that don’t work I’ll try the ez out. I’ll will make to go in the where a pipe cleaner and some brake cleaner and blow it out good and definitely use some antiseize.
 

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A little heat might help. I wouldnt torch it but a heat gun or hair dryer might help if they used any kind of locktite. For a situation like this i would use my reversible impact driver. I think the frame is stout enough to handle the blow. Slot it as suggested above and break it loose with the driver. You can find one at most auto parts stores fairly cheap
 

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The frame is aluminum and partly cast. I would not put my impact driver or hammer drill on that. But if you crack the frame I can ship you my spare lol.

If it were me I'd first do the slot cut with a dremel then pull the fastener with an old school big blade flat screwdriver. Slot it square and tight to fit the blade snugly so there's plenty of material to apply pressure.

That should work, but if that fails then the only thing left is to grind or cut the button head off and like alanh said go after it with those kinds of tools.
 

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I think one common thing that happens, for whatever reason, is some people use a 7/16" Allen to work a 12mm button head (for example). Or people don't realize how much damage a worn or twisted Allen can do even when it was originally sized to fit. A good rule of thumb is to assume a button head is possibly damaged and inspect it, and use a tool that slides in snugly. Never force one into a button head. It's shape is low profile, there is already less material to spread the force. And never use loose-fitting Allen wrenches. It'll incrementally kill you every time.

I end up with weird sets of Allen wrenches because I replace damaged wrenches, especially in the smaller sizes, and I usually get a few since the smaller ones are more prone to damage. I also use ratchet-Allen bits, always by hand, and those can be hard to find individually so I am forced to be careful lol.

Sometimes I swap-in stainless socket cap screws, if space permits and if it happens to look okay depending on where it's located. They have more grab space. But its hard to want to do that when stainless button heads polish-up so nice and look cool.
 

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Congrats! Method??

All torques are in the service manuals in the documentation section. Definitely good to read up here for all your servicing needs. Just beware the drive pulley and rear axle torques are reversed (110 on pulley, 85 on axle, or something like that... doublecheck if/when needed). Here's a link: Warrior Manuals: Parts Service Owners
 

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2012 Yamaha Roadliner S Midnight
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Dremmel a groove across for a big flat head screwdriver.
There is one more option which I ended up having to use on my ex sporster. Get a torx head just a tad bigger than the stripped hole. Hammer it in dead straight not at an angle, tap until you hear and feel it won't go in any more. Then soak the area in WD40 and leave for 10 mins. So assuming you have a ratchet driver slowly losing it up. I hope it helps you like it helped me.
 
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