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I guess we could call a 1979 gs1000L Suzuki a cruiser too, that's what they called it when they tried to sell it. It was an inline 4 1000cc with plastic chrome hanging off of it all over the place. Did 11.45 in the 1/4 some 26 years ago. Where is the line? I drew my line at air cooled v-twins, everybody else can draw them whereever they want to. You could mount a raked frontend and some ape hangers top the front of a tomcat and call it a cruiser I suppose
 

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Discussion Starter #62
Well, since I started this thread I guess I can say it.

WHO GIVES A RATS ARSE!

I personally wouldn't ride a Harley for a couple reasons.

1. Most of those that buy them are buying the image (especially around here).

2. Why would I pay twice the price for half the bike? Buy a ricer, run the piss out of it and dispose of it.[/emoticons/emotion-4.gif]

As for which bike is superior, it'll most likely depend on who's riding it and as for at the drag strip, well, again, who cares! That's just a money game.

Maybe I'm missing something or this is the wrong crowd, not so sure I want to get a bike that all everyone want's to do is talk about quarter mile times.[xx(]

On that note, I'm going for a ride the weather's great today.[/emoticons/emotion-2.gif]
 

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quote:Originally posted by SteveAZ

JP, actually it's not a question of being able to have both bikes, my wife actually agrees with you. The question is can I keep my R1 and stay out of trouble./emoticons/emotion-11.gif] BTW, nice pic! What did you drag in that pic? The R1 drags too, this pic doesn't show it actually dragging, but it does shortly after at the apex.

Download Attachment: pic1.jpeg
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BTW hibs, if I was going to make a trip to California to ride, if sure as heck wouldn't be to run a drag strip. Go ride highway 1, and take some of those roads that riddle back and forth between the Pacific Coast Highway and the 101 especially between Fort Bragg and Leggett, now that's some riding[/emoticons/emotion-4.gif]

Twelving a Warrior[?][?][?]

Steve, I was laying on the pipe about 12" back from the footpegs, it wouldn't go any further.. On some of the left hand turns I buried the foot bracket into the pavement.

Your wife is right, -they usually are...[/emoticons/emotion-4.gif]
Keep the R1, the Warrior is much more than a Quarter mile bike and would be a fun second -or first ride of choice. As far a getting into trouble with the R1, it's not the bike it's the rider... If your thinking about being more responsible, you already are.[/emoticons/emotion-5.gif]
 

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quote:Originally posted by ridingrules

hibs, he said sub-12 second runs on a stock warrior. You're nearly a half-second away from that, and yours is just about the fastest time for a stock warrior I've heard.

Don't worry about it though--I still say I could eat a v-rod for lunch in the twisties (I don't care if they gave it more ground clearance, they haven't changed the rake of the bike).


Sorry, when i first glanced through the post i thought he meant low 12second bikes. We'll see how close i can get to 11s bone stock this year. It's VERY hard though to keep these bikes mod free!
 

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Discussion Starter #66
Tropicalc, not at all, I already expressed my appreciation for the input. I was commenting on the vrod vs. warrior and 1/4 mile times banter.


JP, you're right, but it is so hard not to pull a wheelie or crack the throttle when it's just so easy[/emoticons/emotion-4.gif] and truthfully, if you're exercising self control, what's the point of even having the bike? The real killer is registration and insurance though. Otherwise 2 street legal bikes wouldn't be a problem. I could keep it for strictly track use, but I already have 2 other bikes I race (YZ450F and YFZ450) and that's quite expensive. Track time on these bikes is real EXPENSIVE! Thanks for the input.

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #67
Well, I had a close call this morning on the R1 (dumbarse made a U turn right in front of me) which really made me realize that with less braking and handling, it may have been more than a close call.[/emoticons/emotion-6.gif!] So I think the R1 may be the weapon of choice when doing battle on the streets around here. May get a cruiser a few years down the road when we'd just use it to tour and not as a commuter. Thanks for the input guys, best wishes.

Steve
 

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If I hear one more dope say that Porsche builds the V-rod engine I'm going to puke.

They did the development from VR1000 superbike motor to streetable (with alternator and steady idle) and EPA compliant V-Rod motor. They don't build them. Didn't design it.

This is not the first time Porsche (or Ford) have been in the development process with H-D.

OK ......I feel better.
 

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Price: $16,495 - $16,740 for the street rod before markup.

With the money you can save you can get a turbo, and if you get a used Warrior you can get a big-bore kit and a turbo and put up close to 40hp and 70ft lbs of torque more.

How reliable are the turbo kits out there? If any?
Turbo kits are nice as the power is on demand (twist of the throttle)
Unfortunately there are no turbo kits for the Warrior but several guys have done it.
 

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As someone who’s road raced in AMA, drag raced in IHRA and NHRA, and wrenched for some pretty cool team owners and teams, I feel very fortunate. I’ve been lucky to witness some amazing accomplishments and some spectacular failures. It doesn’t in anyway make me an authority, but it has given me some experience.


Rest assured, except for running up against a less experienced rider on a sport bike or a guy who has some common sense and knows when to back off, given equal skill levels a guy on a sportbike is going to leave a cruiser rider behind. There are 1000 reasons for this and yes, I could author a 19 page dissertation on horsepower and torque, thrust and tractive effort relative to gearing, along with power to weight ratios. The ones who want to learn and read would love it and the majority who don’t want to believe - would simply hate it.


Let’s put aside the typical 60 to 100 horsepower cruiser with a V-twin for a moment. Consider the most kick ass cruiser, the Gen II VMax. Mind you, I like the Gen II VMax. I’m not a hater. I could pretty much have fun all day on a 1980 dual purpose two stroke trail bike – I like bikes that much – so things like the newer generation Max are impressive. That said, you’re dealing with a 700 lb machine that makes about 170 hp. I’ve seen around 168 to 169 stock. They can be modded to 185 to 190 hp easily and without doing what I consider a lot of work 200 is attainable.

A Gen II Suzuki Hayabusa is not a cutting edge sportbike, but is still quite capable on a back road. It is heavy for a sport bike weighing in at 585 lbs. It too is delivered at around 170 to 175 hp depending upon the dyno. My personal bike generally registers between 196 and 199 hp. It has broken 200 hp once. Uncorrected. On a beautiful weather day. SAE corrected it was back to 197+. It makes 90 ft lbs of torque at 3000 rpm, peaks at around 116 to 118 and tapers off slowly back to around 90 ft-lbs at 11,600 rpm.


These two machines use vastly different engine designs but deliver similar peak power number in stock and modified form. The Hayabusa comes with a 100+ lb weight advantage as delivered and is typically rolling on the street at around 550 lbs once the excessively heavy exhaust is removed and replaced. My own weighs in at 500+ with only a little extra effort at weight shedding. There are some heavy comfort and sound deadening pieces added on. The Vmax also enjoys a weight reduction with an exhaust mod but will never make up for the 100 lb excess without significant changes. So we have to consider how much that 100lbs slows acceleration. The rangy wheel base of the Vmax slows handling compared to the gentlemen’s express of the Hayabusa. It’s easy to see why one is distinctly faster given the same amount of effort and attention on a back road. Don’t believe me? How many VMaxes have you seen road racing? If you’re lucky, you’ll see a nut at a track day. It happens, but it’s the exception, not the rule.


The long wheel base of a cruiser slows handling. A VRod will never keep up with a modern 600 on a back road even though those two machines make similar peak power numbers. When I road my very 1st 2006 GSX-R600 my first impression was that someone had stuck a transmission from a mid 90’s Yamaha TZ250 road racer in the cases by mistake. Super short throw and ultra light effort. Blipping downshifts entering corners became the best part of my day. It also out handled my GSX-R1000 so well that I was in and out of slow corners before I had chance to hang off anywhere near as far as my bulky 1000. Mind you, compared to my 500+ lbs ready to race Hayabusa, my “Bulky” 1000 weighed in at 426 lbs full of fuel. Compared to that, the 600 felt only slightly larger than the TZ250. It was heaven for racetrack and back road use.


Would I put my wife on the back of the 600? I could, but the blistering 45 ft lbs of torque that it made meant two up acceleration was slow. Sure it delivered 105 to 107 hp, but it required revs to make that kind of power. It was not a pleasure cruise with her on the back. My Harley Softail makes a pathetic 73 hp and a little over 85 ft-lbs of torque. It makes a bunch of torque at low revs and pulls us both forward as soon as I let the clutch out without touching the throttle. Does it handle like my Hayabusa? No. Does it wobble out of control? No. It’s smooth and comfortable and makes all the right noises for a 45 degree pushrod V-twin. Also, with the twin counter balancers you can place a coin on its side on the engine case and it won’t fall over. That trick won’t work on a Dyna or Touring model since the engine is free to rock in the frame. I have no illusions that the softie is fast or that it will beat anybody. Yes, it’s fun to race other Harley guys, but that’s about it. And I’ve been accused of GSX-R-ing my Softail, but I kind of like to ride everything a little quickly.


So let’s change things up and go back to a cruiser that’s putting out 75 to 85 ponies stock, what are you going to hot rod it to? 100, 120 horses? Maybe you turbo it and build it to 175 hp. Great. What does your cruiser run in the quarter mile? 100 to 115 mph? Maybe it’s a pure race bike that races in Hot Rod Cruiser and runs as quick as 145mph! Wow. But the thing is a death trap on the street. Then you pull up next to the 2015 Kawasaki H2 that I built that delivers 240 hp. License plate, push button start, and driven on back roads every weekend. Slightly longer and heavier than a normal 1000, but far superior in power to a regular liter bike that it’s a joke to mess with guys on S1000RRs and R1’s. It runs mid 9’s at 155 to 158 mph in the quarter mile with stock wheel base, stock ride height and a not so talented rider on board.

All that said, my 40 horsepower Shovel Head Wide Glide is a joy to ride. It’s slow as molasses and vibrates. I wouldn’t even race a guy on an 883 Sportster with it, but it’s fun to have a 40 year-old bike at the local coffee shop. You can’t just walk into a shop and buy one and you better know how to keep it running. Like they say. Anyone can ride one. Few can ride it home. I’ve learned that there’s always someone faster out there and there’s always someone with more talent. No matter what I build, I’m never going to keep up with my friend’s super charged Hayabusa that runs six second quarter mile times at 220 mph. I won’t run with my friend’s Pro Stock bike or my other buddy’s Top Fuel Harley. I’m good with that. I can say that I out ran a ZX11 on my Buell back in the day, but that guy had no idea what he was doing at the drag strip. He should have been deep in the tens while I was just tickling 11s on the lumpy twin. Truth be told it was just pure luck I lined up against him and he was a 12 second pilot.


That’s my very long winded way of saying enjoy what you have and understand what it was made to do.
 

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Well said Craig, lotsa common sense in what you say.
I still love riding my warrior, awesome low down torque. My Diavel gets my adrenalin pumping and is my choice for traffic light derbys against 200hp sport bikes, I just beat them to 100kph then back off and wave them on. I also have a 1975 Z900 US import, its fun to ride and gets lots of attention, different type of fun.
Yes, enjoy each bike for its fun factor.
 

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I love my Warrior and my Z1000 equally, for different reasons. My Z is for the mountains when I want to play with the rest of my sportbike friends. My Warrior is for everything else. That's not to say that I don't ride the Warrior in the mountains, it's just a different ride than when I'm on my Z. I know, without a shadow of doubt, that I could not keep pace with myself on the Z, if I was riding the Warrior and following myself on the Z. Umm, I think my brain just locked up.
Anyway, with equal riders, the sportbike pulls away, especially when the road stops going straight.
 
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