RS Warrior Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
843 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
On the ride home from Daytona after bike week I switched bikes with my friend Gene and rode his Triumph Bonneville for about 100 miles. I don't know what year his bike is but it is one of the recent modern replicas that Triumph sells. The bike is small in stature, not sure of the weight, and the motor is less than 800 cc, not sure of exact displacement. I rode under varying conditions suchas in town, small highway with some curves, interstate on / off ramps (heh), cruising on the interstate at moderate and high speeds, and cutting through traffic on the interstate. Even though I have always liked the look of his bike, I did not expect it to do well. I really wrang this bike out for all it had, and was pleasantly suprised.


I thought the bike would not handle well, but it did. Steering response was good at all speeds, the bike went where you pointed it and smoothly stayed on that line. Even at top speed, throttle pinned slipping between rolling road blocks on the interstate. Even turning hard to the left up an interstate on ramp hard on the throttle, scraping something (oops), it was sure and smooth.As with most bikes it did not like to turn if I was off throttle or braking, but give it some throttle and it turned very smoothly, even loaded down with me and a trulyimpressive amount of luggage. Braking was quite good, but not fantastic.


I was a little suprised by the engine, not as much as the handling, but a little suprised. The engine was sort of weak at moderate throttle, but if you turned the throttle to the stop it had decent acceleration. If you are used to riding more powerful bikes, and have learned more precise throttle control, just unlearn all that and you will have a blast riding this bike. When you start off from a stop, just roll the throttle to the stop and keep it there, no finesse required. If you want to go dodging through the traffic on the interstate, however, you need a little MORE finesse than you would on a more powerful bike. You have to build up a head of steam and maintain it. If you are forced to slow down you will have to wait until you can find enough room to build up speed again. This bike does not have the power to react quickly to a small opening when you are already at 80 mph. Keep in mind that I am talking about agressively slicing through traffic at high speeds, not normal highway riding, the bike has plenty of power for that.


At one pointI just hunkered down, pinned the throttle, and held it for as long as I could before coming up on traffic. The bike got to 100 mph without difficulty, 105 was more difficult, and beyond that the speedo crept up to an indicated 115 mph very slowly. At that point I had to back off due to traffic. The needle was still creeping up with glacial slowness so I think it had a bit more in it.


The Bonneville was pretty comfortable at speeds up to maybe 70 mph, more comfortable than any of my bikes. There was a sharp change, however, once you hit speeds around 80 to 90 mph. At those speeds it was at least as uncomfortable as my Warrior due to the lack of protection from the airstream, and it became really difficult to keep from pulling on the bars for any length of time.


I've always loved the old school look of this bike and, after riding it for a good bit, have to say that it is also a real blast to ride. At times I had a Warrior and an R1 struggling to catch back up to me, but not for very long of course. Thanks Gene!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,726 Posts
I know a guy with an 07 Bonneville and he loves it. Actually I can't recall ever hearing anything negative about Triumph, but I'm sure someone here has. I like the old school look as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
355 Posts
Indeed Darrel,


You throwing that bike around was fun to seee. Infact, I thought some luggage was going to fly off the back. It goes to show the ability of the rider is whats is really imporant and the ability to exploit the bike what what it can do. I found myself being out run from you a couple of times and was punching the wind to catch up. Gene and I were commenting on your skills as an accoplished rider and he himself was surprised at what his Bonneville could do. Thing is, you put a bug in his head about an R1. I think you gave him a complex about what bike he wants now because when I got home, I called him right away to see if he made it safe and he was allready researching his next bike. In fact, he hadnt unpacked yet and I suspect he still hadnt even taken his helmet off yet. He spoke very very highly of your R1.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
843 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Chris! I had fun on that ride.


You are cracking me up with your story about Gene. I am glad he had fun on the R1, but I hope he looks at other bikes also.


I am not sure if Gene knows, but he did manage to get the front wheel off the ground on his Bonneville. Shawn told me that right before we rolled out of his driveway, Gene made a hard launch from that stop sign to the north, and got it done. Must have been all that luggage on the back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,957 Posts
Test rode a Triumph Scrambler 900 a while back. Really way cool retro bike that I liked a bunch, but di not end up with one. Very comfy and enough oomph from the engine room and the anchors. Rode the nutz Triumph Street Triple as well. Fine machines those limey scoots.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top