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Discussion Starter #21
the bike was awesome looking. that's a **** of a face plant. you`re a hard headed man. I'm glad you came out as well as you did. when I was hit by a car the insurance company did me right. they didn't want to but they did. I hope yours treats you well. I'm very interested in your rebirthing of this mean warrior. keep us posted and take it easy. healing is slow. no need to rush it.
Says a lot for having the right safety gear. I’m a living testimony to that!
 

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Discussion Starter #24
**** Sam that video makes me frakking cry and you are right you were pulling away right up to the moment your Beast stood-up and in that heartbeat that was that. Its a true wide world of sports moment. Heal quick and post video of your next pass so we can cheer you back to the winners circle.
Thanks, Mike. Great to hear from you again. I’m looking forward to the Phoenix Project! Rising from the ashes!
 

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Val345, I am deeply indebted to you for sharing this. I am in the process of adding a lot of power to my Warrior and this is a great warning about what can happen if you get over aggressive on the launch.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Human bodywork

Here is a selfie I took a couple of days after the accident. The monochrome really shows the bruising from the busted collarbone, and three ribs, along with the muscle damage from the body slam. Last week I took my suit back to the builder, Syed, and told him to add even more padding to the relatively streamlined drag racing suit they built for me. It had some padding, but not enough to prevent some of the bruising and joint damage on my elbows. I hope I never need it, but I said the same thing when I bought the suit originally!
 

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Hey there, gang. Suffered a setback at the dragstrip in December with the turbo Warrior. The bike had been running flawlessly, with a best to date ET of 9.81 at 136 mph in the quarter mile at Orlando Speedworld.

I had made two changes to my setup before the night of the wreck; a cooler looking Corbin seat with less of a back stop, and implemented the 2 step launch on the Fusion (Powercommander) controller. I left at 3500 rpm on the 2 step, and when the launch engaged, the bike immediately hooked and went out from under me. Last thing I remember before getting slammed to the ground was the fuel tank right in front of my face.

I hit the ground pretty much on my right side and face, which knocked me out for a couple of minutes. The bike flipped over, landed on the left side of the fuel tank, and blew the fuel fitting out of the bottom of the tank while the bike slid all the way to the 330 foot mark before catching fire.

I ended up with a broken collarbone, three broken ribs, whiplash, and wrist and elbow bruises. Thank God I invested in good safety gear.

The bike didn’t fare so well as you can see in the attached before and after pictures. The before picture was taken right before that pass so you can get an idea of how much work was done to the bike.

I’m still a little achy, but am doing well. Grateful that I’m retired and able to convalesce. The poor Warrior, unfortunately, needs a lot of work, but thankfully did not suffer any structural damage. Everything I can determine, other than the sheet metal of course, is fuel system and electrical related. I either had or found all the replacements already on eBay. Other stuff is also mostly cosmetic. The right side of the bike was unscathed, thankfully which has all the turbo and related manifolding, so good to go there. Overall the biggest nuisance is the fire extinguishing agent which uses a compound that’s highly alkaline and tends to attack uncoated or anodized metals. A small price to pay.

I was asked to post this here, so I will be keeping it updated as the project progresses so you can see the details of the turbo setup as well. I plan to powder coat the frame, do a top end overhaul of the engine, and install my trusty old Corbin stinger seat along with a set of solid wheelie bars.

If you would like to see a video of this train wreck, go to YouTube and search for “Orlando Speedworld gone bad” and enjoy. Note that I left the ZX 14 in the near lane in the dust. Could have been a good pass if I had kept it upright.
Woah, looks like you slid right off the bike! I loved you paint scheme, sorry to hear this.
 

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Discussion Starter #32 (Edited)
Val345, I am deeply indebted to you for sharing this. I am in the process of adding a lot of power to my Warrior and this is a great warning about what can happen if you get over aggressive on the launch.
Thank your for the praise, but unfortunately I broke a couple of rules. I made too many changes at once. Using a different seat, and launching under boost with the 2 step. If you are smooth with the clutch, and only use a two step with wheelie bars, then it’s hard to get in trouble. On my 9.82 pass, I left at 4,000 rpm, letting the clutch pull the engine down before cranking the throttle wide open. It took off with the wheel just hovering, and the 60 foot Time was 1.53 which is really good. After posting this video, the pros I know immediately chastised me about using the two step without wheelie bars. I will definitely put them on the rebuild, not just to prevent me from doing the same thing, but because I’m not quick enough on my reflexes anymore to react in time to these incidents as you can see in the video. The lessons here are to wear safety gear all the time, and race only at a track like this where you don’t have to worry about getting run over if you fall, plus paramedics are at your side in seconds. I’ve got over 17,000 miles on the Warrior, of which over 12,000 of that are at the drag strip. I took my eye off the ball, that’s all. Be safe.
 

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I hate that you had to learn what you did the hard way. I'm thinking once you get it all back together, you might be able to dip into the 8s.
 

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Discussion Starter #34 (Edited)
I hate that you had to learn what you did the hard way. I'm thinking once you get it all back together, you might be able to dip into the 8s.
I just noticed and fixed the typo in my previous post. It was a 9.82 ET, not 9.19. It would take a bigger turbo, or perhaps a featherweight rider to get into the eights. I’m just hoping to have what it takes to get back into the groove again. More of a personal goal.
 

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If there is an upside at least you did not get spit off @ + 130 through the traps.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
If there is an upside at least you did not get spit off @ + 130 through the traps.
You’re right. That is exactly what happened to another fellow racer at our track last night. Grabbed a handful of front brake and low sided. He broke collarbone and shattered one wrist. Should have been worse. He lost his helmet sometime during the spill.
 

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A sobering story with some good lessons. Thanks for sharing, hope you are healing well. Shows that old guys can still push the envelope and make mistakes too. I will watch your postings to check your physical and mechanical progress :)
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Val345, the guy who low sided at 130, did he just slam on the brakes too hard? How should he have done it?
From what I heard he locked up the front. I’ve found that the far end of the track can be a little greasy, and have locked up the front end early in my racing days. One night I did it on an eighth mile track that was too damp and the bike slammed from one foot peg to the other and ended up straight up again uneventfully, except for one scared rider.

I find the best way is to roll into the brake squeezing harder gradually as more weight transfers to the front. When going through the traps under power, especially at 120 plus speeds, the front end is light, and if too much brake is applied too soon, the front wheel will tend to lock up. This is something we are taught at Road race track days, and can even be practiced at lower speeds. You will be amazed how much brake you can apply if done gradually.
 

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I find the best way is to roll into the brake squeezing harder gradually as more weight transfers to the front. When going through the traps under power, especially at 120 plus speeds, the front end is light, and if too much brake is applied too soon, the front wheel will tend to lock up. This is something we are taught at Road race track days, and can even be practiced at lower speeds. You will be amazed how much brake you can apply if done gradually.
This is good to know! I just started drag racing three seasons ago on a mostly stock Warrior (I'm 61 now) and have been recently contemplating some upgrades, a turbo being one of them. I suspect I may be braking like this instinctively but from now on I'll be more conscious of it and practice doing it properly. I don't know if I'll ever actually get some work done but if I do, hopefully this bit of information will save me from some trouble. :eek:

Very happy that you came out as well as you did. Looking forward to the rebuild. Keep us posted. And keep the rubber side down!
 
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