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I searched the forums, and realize that in some states vertical license plates are legal, and in others they are not, but my question is if I reside in a state that allows a vertical plate, and travel to one (like Florida) that does not allow it, can I be ticketed?


I read the fine there is $1000 and I would hate to have to pay that!





Thanks.
 

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I live in alabama, and it is legal to have a vertical plate. I ride to Fl. all the time. I called the police in Fl. to ask that same ?. His reply was that you could be ticketed, but he thought that you probably wouldn't unless you were stopped for something else, but a $1000 fine would be a **** of a way to find out. Actually it's $200 or $250 for the moving violation,$1000 for the improper tag, oh! and the court costs.So your first offense could be anywhere from $1200 to $1800 according to Fl. law. I run a horizontal tag until I hear otherwise.
 

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What's weird about this is your vehicle is required to conform to your home state but you can travel anywhere. When a state law differs for which you could be ticketed there is suppose to be 'notice' for non-residents which typically is a sign. Like when you enter a helmet state from a non-helmet state there is often a sign saying motorcyclists must wear helmets. With that notice you can be ticketed.


I've heard of several guys getting tickets out-of-state for vertical plates on the side of the bike. Most were for the plate NOT being at the very back of the bike so its visible from both sides of the bike. A few were simply because its vertical (which is becoming more common as state laws change). My impression is that those who couldn't get out of the ticket were unable to prove the vertical (or forward) plate is legal in their state. Its not common for a state to make a law allowing something, its usually indicated as allowed by the lack of a law against it. One indicator is if new (often custom) bikes are sold in your state with vertical/forward plates but its still a good idea to do a net search for your state's motor vehicle laws (not just the driver handbook) and read it yourself.


This is often a good resource: http://www.dmv.org/


If you searched for "Alabama Motor Vehicle Code" then in the results one link you'd get would be:


http://www.dmv.org/al-alabama/automotive-law/vehicle-code.php


Where there's a link to the Alabama MV Code.
 

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2008 Florida Law on License Plates (can't be vertical) specifically applies only to Florida registered vehicles:


Title XXIII
MOTOR VEHICLES Chapter 316
STATE UNIFORM TRAFFIC CONTROL View Entire Chapter

316.605 Licensing of vehicles.--


(1) Every vehicle, at all times while driven, stopped, or parked upon any highways, roads, or streets of this state, shall be licensed in the name of the owner thereof in accordance with the laws of this state unless such vehicle is not required by the laws of this state to be licensed in this state and shall, except as otherwise provided in s. 320.0706 for front-end registration license plates on truck tractors and s. 320.086(5) which exempts display of license plates on described former military vehicles, display the license plate or both of the license plates assigned to it by the state, one on the rear and, if two, the other on the front of the vehicle, each to be securely fastened to the vehicle outside the main body of the vehicle not higher than 60 inches and not lower than 12 inches from the ground and no more than 24 inches to the left or right of the centerline of the vehicle, and in such manner as to prevent the plates from swinging, and all letters, numerals, printing, writing, and other identification marks upon the plates regarding the word "Florida," the registration decal, and the alphanumeric designation shall be clear and distinct and free from defacement, mutilation, grease, and other obscuring matter, so that they will be plainly visible and legible at all times 100 feet from the rear or front. Vehicle license plates shall be affixed and displayed in such a manner that the letters and numerals shall be read from left to right parallel to the ground. No vehicle license plate may be displayed in an inverted or reversed position or in such a manner that the letters and numbers and their proper sequence are not readily identifiable. Nothing shall be placed upon the face of a Florida plate except as permitted by law or by rule or regulation of a governmental agency. No license plates other than those furnished by the state shall be used. However, if the vehicle is not required to be licensed in this state, the license plates on such vehicle issued by another state, by a territory, possession, or district of the United States, or by a foreign country, substantially complying with the provisions hereof, shall be considered as complying with this chapter. A violation of this subsection is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.
 

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You only need to adhere to your home state laws.For example,In Florida it says you only need to have a rear license plate on your car. In minnesota you need a front and rear plate on your car. But if you are in Minnesota with florida plates your still only required to have just a rear plate.
 

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Scoper50 said:
You only need to adhere to your home state laws.For example,In Florida it says you only need to have a rear license plate on your car. In minnesota you need a front and rear plate on your car. But if you are in Minnesota with florida plates your still only required to have just a rear plate.

Well put
 

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You all should just move to Montana!


No helmet laws, side mount plates are fine, no turn signals or lighted plates required, no speedo, horn, or running lights required, no emissions, no inspections... Pretty much as loose as it gets.


I took my driving test on a kick start '74 Sporty, with no accessories of any kind, several years ago. The lady asked me where my speedometer was, and when I told her the Law doesn't require it, she looked down at her shoes and said, "Oh, yeah..."


Plus, Montana's about 4 or 5 of your States put together, so you don't need to worry about other State laws... LOL
 

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Arizona Warrior said:
What's weird about this is your vehicle is required to conform to your home state but you can travel anywhere. When a state law differs for which you could be ticketed there is suppose to be 'notice' for non-residents which typically is a sign. Like when you enter a helmet state from a non-helmet state there is often a sign saying motorcyclists must wear helmets. With that notice you can be ticketed.




Not So, I live in PA which has NO helmet law.I often travel into New Jersey and I have never seen a sign stating helmet use required.I travel over many diferent bridges into Jersey and have never seen any sign.
 

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Now I know you're just bustin' my chops (lol)
I said 'typically' a sign (in order to ticket)! But I'm glad you posted because I have this thing for laws that tend to entrap, and I think we should make 'em all go away! Your post reminds me that I'm not thinking like an 'eastern US' person and the signs I've seen have all been here in the west. For example, I drive past them coming back into Oregon even on the bridge from Washington, also a helmet-law state - isn't that weird? ID and MT have no helmet laws, maybe that's why. In AZ its different because UT NM TX are no-helmet states, so over there I lost track. Of course we wear helmets anyway.

Back on topic. Of course you are right there are other possibilities, maybe its just 'ignorance is no excuse so pay the fine' but I like to think that if enough challenges happen the law will require fair communication: http://www.bikersrights.com/

Or maybe since PA has a 20-and-younger helmet law (modified if a safety course is passed) (http://www.iihs.org/laws/HelmetUseCurrent.aspx) maybe NJ trains officers not to enforce the helmet law for out-of-state riders? Probably not! Anyway good luck riding in NJ
(lol).

BTW thanks for posting this!


slngshott said:
Arizona Warrior said:
What's weird about this is your vehicle is required to conform to your home state but you can travel anywhere. When a state law differs for which you could be ticketed there is suppose to be 'notice' for non-residents which typically is a sign. Like when you enter a helmet state from a non-helmet state there is often a sign saying motorcyclists must wear helmets. With that notice you can be ticketed.
Not So, I live in PA which has NO helmet law. I often travel into New Jersey and I have never seen a sign stating helmet use required. I travel over many diferent bridges into Jersey and have never seen any sign.
 

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I believe the helmet laws fall into a different category much like seatbelt laws. The license plate mounting


and other specific vehicle rules/regulations would fall under the requirements dictated by the state which


the vehicle is registered. Helmets much like seatbelts and currently being adopted cell phone regs do


not fall in the same category, maybe more like a moving violation.
 

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That somehow makes sense. Not to hijack the vertical plate topic . . .

Being stubborn and old enough to remember simpler days, I still believe since helmet laws vary by state there should be a sign, maybe that's only because Oregon has helmet signs and seat belt signs, and AZ had seat belt signs (and probably still does), so I'm used to seeing them, and it probably sways my thinking.

Is the basic seat belt law national? Anyway I don't know of any states that don't have a seat belt law, and don't want to look it up! But I'm wondering if only the penalty for not wearing a seat belt varies by state, but every state requires it so everyone knows, then maybe that makes it different than helmet laws. Said another way, maybe its unfair to make a helmet law a moving violation for out-of-state riders, considering there are so many states with no helmet law. Still, a helmet is safety equipment even if its not bolted down like seatbelts.


Getting back on topic, the license plate laws make a lot more sense, although they look better down low and vertical on a bike, but anyway its at least state-specific so out-of-stater's won't likely get a ticket like you said.

Again, everything you said makes sense too.


NJWarrior said:
I believe the helmet laws fall into a different category much like seatbelt laws. The license plate mounting
and other specific vehicle rules/regulations would fall under the requirements dictated by the state which
the vehicle is registered. Helmets much like seatbelts and currently being adopted cell phone regs do
not fall in the same category, maybe more like a moving violation.
 

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I agree the states should post signs at the borders, I have seen them for radar detectors


but haven't noticed helmets. Probably since I'd wear a helmet anyway. Thinking back,


I usually only notice those signs on major routes, i.e. interstates and state routes


which continue into a new state. I also just remembered another NJ sign about wipers


and headlights.
 

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Arizona Warrior said:
Wipers and headlights? I can't resist . . .


Does NJ require headlights always on, and wipers always on!!!



Did Jersey up and move to the pacific northwest!!

NJ requires if wipersare on headlights must be on. In a way it the law wasn't a bad idea,


wehad alot of morons that would drivearound in crap weather and neverturn the lights on.


My only problem is I don't like government creating so many laws telling us what we can


and can't do,but I don't want to open that can of worms. LOL
 

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NH "Live Free Or Die" no seat belt law if you are over 18 ( we do have signs warning you though). no helmet, but what really gets me is Maine No helmet , and get this-- nothing on the books for eye protection. NH even makes you wear glasses but not in Maine. I cant imagine riding without glasses on.

sorry to get off topic.
 

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That answers that!
Let's all make our states join NH whattya say?


aaronwandell said:
NH "Live Free Or Die" no seat belt law if you are over 18 ( we do have signs warning you though). no helmet, but what really gets me is Maine No helmet , and get this-- nothing on the books for eye protection. NH even makes you wear glasses but not in Maine. I cant imagine riding without glasses on.
sorry to get off topic.
 

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aaronwandell said:
NH "Live Free Or Die" no seat belt law if you are over 18 ( we do have signs warning you though). no helmet, but what really gets me is Maine No helmet , and get this-- nothing on the books for eye protection. NH even makes you wear glasses but not in Maine. I cant imagine riding without glasses on.
In Quebec, you have to wear a helmet, but you are not required to wear eye protection (goggles). As you said, nobody rides without glasses... but what if they force you to wear those crazy diving goggles? LOL, no way man. The plates must be horizontal... since most states will abide to this rule soon, I decided to get an horizontal side mounted plate and install it behind the rear pulley... so it does not stick outside to much.
 

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Anyone know what the law is in TX I've been passed by many cops since I mounted my plate on the side and verical and haven't had any problems but knowing the law would be nice
 

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In Kansas, this would be a "fix-it" ticket... meaning if you correct the problem in 30 days and present evidence to an officer or judge, the court is required to void the ticket and you pay nothing. Theres no limit to how many times you can get something "fixed" if you catch my drift ;)
 

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You know even
if you are compliant to your state laws you could be fined if traveling
to another state. If avoid this you may want to consider

getting a mount like the one offered by Top Down Products. It's a nice ooking mount that can rotate your license plate in any orientation.

Their website is www.topdownpro.com
 
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