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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I know there are probably a hundred or so threads like this but most of the pictures that were hosted years ago don't show up anymore and I'd like some expert advice. I bought this Warrior as my first bike with about 7000 miles on it. Now it's got about 10,000 on it and needs the rear tire replaced. When I ordered my rear tire, I decided not to order a new front tire because just by eyeballing it there's lots of tread left. After reading all the topics on here regarding cupping I'm beginning to think twice. The tire has obviously begun cupping, you can feel it running a hand over it and it's easy to just look at and see. I took some pictures to try and capture it the best I can. It may have been this way when I bought it. I have no idea how many miles are on this tire and I doubt it's the original from 2002. I haven't noticed any vibration or anything while cornering, but I do ride hard and I'm not easy on the brakes. I did have one instance of traction loss while cornering hard at about 85 mph. The bike slid about 2 feet toward the outside of the turn but maintained the lean angle and regained traction no problem. I attributed this to the tires just not being grippy enough, but now I'm thinking the cupping may have something to do with it since the general consensus is the Dunlop D220s are plenty grippy. So, my two questions to all the experts on here: Should I replace this tire? Has anyone else experienced some minor traction loss with the Dunlops? (my pegs were not dragging yet, but 85-90 it pretty quick to be cornering hard and I probably had about an inch between the peg and the road) Thanks in advance.

Mike








 

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The D220 I have on front is pushing 15k miles. I keep my pressure between 36-38lbs. Mine is finally almost smooth with little to no tread on the sides. It is getting replaced tomorrow. Most likely by a Dunlop Roadsmart only because that is what is on the back.

If you have the $$ and can be down for the time it takes to change a tire, do it now. If you dont, do it as soon as you can. Otherwise, take a chance like me and ride it till its bald!!!
 

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i switched my front tire from a dunlop to the avon storm ultra2 last season..I dont ride real hard (cornering) but i could feel the difference in grip...i changed mine t about 4k when it started cupping, it was a leftover bike, think it sat unmoved fro a couple years, but i would change it, and i will always run the avons from now on..
 

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I also went to the Avon Storm Ultra2 up front last year, and I think its the best front tire I've ever had on this beast.

But to the OP's question: if you are in a dry region and the tires are not cut or damaged, I'd ride it based on tread pictured. You can run down to 3/32" or even 2/32" tread depth on the front, and down to the threads on the rear if you are brave enough lol. Of course, if you want to hot-rod or ride wet, then get a new tire first! I usually change mine a hint earlier than necessary.

i switched my front tire from a dunlop to the avon storm ultra2 last season..I dont ride real hard (cornering) but i could feel the difference in grip...i changed mine t about 4k when it started cupping, it was a leftover bike, think it sat unmoved fro a couple years, but i would change it, and i will always run the avons from now on..
 

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Keeping this separate:

You can read the tire's 'date code' to determine its manufacture date. I've attached a blown-up jpg with quality maybe good enough to read lol.
There is also a link in the Popular Mods post under tires (go figure) for a wiki description of tire date codes. I think Dunlop's website has something
about their recommended tire age maximum. Maybe its like 10 years or so.

Since I've attached this jpg about how to read a tire's 'date code' I hope you don't mind that I've added this topic into Popular Mods for others to find.

[Added} Picture of Tire Date Code has been moved to the Library Documentation forum.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for all the input. I plan on replacing the tire just don't want to do it right this second. Again, no vibrations while cornering or anything. I'm sure the cupping is due to being run at 36 psi as many have stated is too low. It seems as though there is plenty of tread left and I don't want to toss the tire if there's nothing making it unsafe.
 

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I say change the tyre.

Quote: "Thanks for all the input. I plan on replacing the tire just don't want to do it right this second." *

Tyres harden with age.
They may look ok - but the grip diminishes as they harden.

You have already had a warning when the front pushed and you were fortunate to get away with it.

If we were talking about a rear tyre, I would say do it when you can afford it, but the punishment for not changing the front will be severe and instant!

*The cost of a new front tyre will be minimal compared to the cost of the repairs if you choose to "save money".

There is no justification for "cutting corners" :)D) where tyres are concerned.

Treat yourself to a PAIR of tyres - the bike will feel like brand new!
 

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Dump the tire, and figure out why it's cupping.

Heavy bike and front brakes = cupping. It is natural for a heavy bike to cup the tires. The dunlop D220 does it worse than the Avon. I read in a magazine that heavy use of the front brake will also cause the tire to cup. Remember these bike run a sport/tour tire. The sport/tour tire is developed for a bike weighing 100 to 150 less than our beloved warriors. I switched to Avons also.

just food for thought.

BTW I use my front brake religously. I always have and do not plan to change.
 

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Thats the way mine looked up until i replaced it last week. What a world of difference i put on a new Sheinko and cornering is a amazing now.
 

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Heavy bike and front brakes = cupping. It is natural for a heavy bike to cup the tires. The dunlop D220 does it worse than the Avon. I read in a magazine that heavy use of the front brake will also cause the tire to cup. Remember these bike run a sport/tour tire. The sport/tour tire is developed for a bike weighing 100 to 150 less than our beloved warriors. I switched to Avons also.

just food for thought.

BTW I use my front brake religously. I always have and do not plan to change.
I killed the stock BT-020 in 3400 miles. Evenly worn to the wear bars side-to-side, right to the edge of the tire. No cupping or other wierdness. Coming from sportbikes, braking as hard as possible is part of how I ride, never cupped a tire. If my Warrior started cupping a tire, I'd be wondering what is wrong with the setup first. Second, don't run POS tires. ETA: While lurking at my local shop, I got to wonder about the massively overweight HD rider trying to get a deal on the cheapest POS tire in the shop to stick on the back of his equally fat pig of a bike. WTF, why would you run cheap-ass tires?
 

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That tire is notorious for that problem. Not much more than a rim protector as far as tires go. Under inflation is also a factor. Ditch the tire. As others have stated the Avon is a great all around replacement.
 

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i would either:
A. replace the tire or
B. ride real easy and no hard corners

trying to squeeze every last mile out of a tire isnt worth the risk of wrecking out and possible injury or worse, death :(
 

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I run a Pirelli Road Angel ST on the Front and a Dunlop D407 on the Rear.

The Road Angel gives me perfect sensation for all sorts of riding conditions and copes with the heavier load this bike gives it. so it reduces the chance of cupping.

The D407 was designed for the new Harley 2009 FL and unfortunately here in Aus only come with the words Harley Davidson imprinted on them, but my Tyre Mechanic ground the words of for me before he fitted it to my Warrior :eek:)
 

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I would still ride with it, but that is just me. When it comes time to replace why not get what the high mileage guys run, and spoon a Pilot Road on there? Trust me, the sooner you get away from muscle cruiser tires, and into sport touring tires you will be happier with the better grip, and better life out of them.
 

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Simple answer: There's only one thing connecting you and your bike to the pavement. How good do you want that connection to be?
 

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Some great advice here, I am up for a new front, will go with the avon from the comments here. Not worth risking a front end slide, rear OK , front bad. My Dunlop was good though and wore very evenly, running 38psi.
 

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Check out the Michelin Pilot Road 2 also. They are cheaper at the moment than Avon and give higher mileage:}


Some great advice here, I am up for a new front, will go with the avon from the comments here. Not worth risking a front end slide, rear OK , front bad. My Dunlop was good though and wore very evenly, running 38psi.
 

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I no longer take any chances with the front tire. Had a cupped front "avon" that ended up being a big factor in me breaking my ankle a while back. Thankfully that was back before work forced us to change to crappy medical insurance. No matter what brand of tire you will loose the contact patch with the road when leaning with cupped tire. I have the avon storm2 on mine currently and very happy with it so far.
 
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